Women’s Outsider Art, Part VII:
Helen Martins
Born in South Africa in 1897, Martins was briefly married before returning to live with her parents, who left her their house after they died. Martins used cement, glass, and wire to decorate the interior of her home and later build sculptures in her garden, drawing inspiration from Christian biblical texts, the poetry of Omar Khayyam, and various works by William Blake. Martin’s longtime exposure to the fine crushed glass she used to decorate her walls and ceilings eventually caused her eyesight to start failing, leading her to commit suicide in 1976. Her house— known as the Owl House— has been kept intact as a museum.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VII:
Helen Martins
Born in South Africa in 1897, Martins was briefly married before returning to live with her parents, who left her their house after they died. Martins used cement, glass, and wire to decorate the interior of her home and later build sculptures in her garden, drawing inspiration from Christian biblical texts, the poetry of Omar Khayyam, and various works by William Blake. Martin’s longtime exposure to the fine crushed glass she used to decorate her walls and ceilings eventually caused her eyesight to start failing, leading her to commit suicide in 1976. Her house— known as the Owl House— has been kept intact as a museum.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VII:
Helen Martins
Born in South Africa in 1897, Martins was briefly married before returning to live with her parents, who left her their house after they died. Martins used cement, glass, and wire to decorate the interior of her home and later build sculptures in her garden, drawing inspiration from Christian biblical texts, the poetry of Omar Khayyam, and various works by William Blake. Martin’s longtime exposure to the fine crushed glass she used to decorate her walls and ceilings eventually caused her eyesight to start failing, leading her to commit suicide in 1976. Her house— known as the Owl House— has been kept intact as a museum.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VII:
Helen Martins
Born in South Africa in 1897, Martins was briefly married before returning to live with her parents, who left her their house after they died. Martins used cement, glass, and wire to decorate the interior of her home and later build sculptures in her garden, drawing inspiration from Christian biblical texts, the poetry of Omar Khayyam, and various works by William Blake. Martin’s longtime exposure to the fine crushed glass she used to decorate her walls and ceilings eventually caused her eyesight to start failing, leading her to commit suicide in 1976. Her house— known as the Owl House— has been kept intact as a museum.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VII:
Helen Martins
Born in South Africa in 1897, Martins was briefly married before returning to live with her parents, who left her their house after they died. Martins used cement, glass, and wire to decorate the interior of her home and later build sculptures in her garden, drawing inspiration from Christian biblical texts, the poetry of Omar Khayyam, and various works by William Blake. Martin’s longtime exposure to the fine crushed glass she used to decorate her walls and ceilings eventually caused her eyesight to start failing, leading her to commit suicide in 1976. Her house— known as the Owl House— has been kept intact as a museum.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VII:
Helen Martins
Born in South Africa in 1897, Martins was briefly married before returning to live with her parents, who left her their house after they died. Martins used cement, glass, and wire to decorate the interior of her home and later build sculptures in her garden, drawing inspiration from Christian biblical texts, the poetry of Omar Khayyam, and various works by William Blake. Martin’s longtime exposure to the fine crushed glass she used to decorate her walls and ceilings eventually caused her eyesight to start failing, leading her to commit suicide in 1976. Her house— known as the Owl House— has been kept intact as a museum.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VII:
Helen Martins
Born in South Africa in 1897, Martins was briefly married before returning to live with her parents, who left her their house after they died. Martins used cement, glass, and wire to decorate the interior of her home and later build sculptures in her garden, drawing inspiration from Christian biblical texts, the poetry of Omar Khayyam, and various works by William Blake. Martin’s longtime exposure to the fine crushed glass she used to decorate her walls and ceilings eventually caused her eyesight to start failing, leading her to commit suicide in 1976. Her house— known as the Owl House— has been kept intact as a museum.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VII:
Helen Martins
Born in South Africa in 1897, Martins was briefly married before returning to live with her parents, who left her their house after they died. Martins used cement, glass, and wire to decorate the interior of her home and later build sculptures in her garden, drawing inspiration from Christian biblical texts, the poetry of Omar Khayyam, and various works by William Blake. Martin’s longtime exposure to the fine crushed glass she used to decorate her walls and ceilings eventually caused her eyesight to start failing, leading her to commit suicide in 1976. Her house— known as the Owl House— has been kept intact as a museum.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VII:
Helen Martins
Born in South Africa in 1897, Martins was briefly married before returning to live with her parents, who left her their house after they died. Martins used cement, glass, and wire to decorate the interior of her home and later build sculptures in her garden, drawing inspiration from Christian biblical texts, the poetry of Omar Khayyam, and various works by William Blake. Martin’s longtime exposure to the fine crushed glass she used to decorate her walls and ceilings eventually caused her eyesight to start failing, leading her to commit suicide in 1976. Her house— known as the Owl House— has been kept intact as a museum.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VII:
Helen Martins
Born in South Africa in 1897, Martins was briefly married before returning to live with her parents, who left her their house after they died. Martins used cement, glass, and wire to decorate the interior of her home and later build sculptures in her garden, drawing inspiration from Christian biblical texts, the poetry of Omar Khayyam, and various works by William Blake. Martin’s longtime exposure to the fine crushed glass she used to decorate her walls and ceilings eventually caused her eyesight to start failing, leading her to commit suicide in 1976. Her house— known as the Owl House— has been kept intact as a museum.
—from Wikipedia

Women’s Outsider Art, Part VII:

Helen Martins

Born in South Africa in 1897, Martins was briefly married before returning to live with her parents, who left her their house after they died. Martins used cement, glass, and wire to decorate the interior of her home and later build sculptures in her garden, drawing inspiration from Christian biblical texts, the poetry of Omar Khayyam, and various works by William Blake. Martin’s longtime exposure to the fine crushed glass she used to decorate her walls and ceilings eventually caused her eyesight to start failing, leading her to commit suicide in 1976. Her house— known as the Owl House— has been kept intact as a museum.

—from Wikipedia

Women’s Outsider Art, Part VI:
Inez Nathaniel Walker
Born in South Carolina in 1911, Inez Nathaniel Walker joined the African American migration to the North in the 1930s. She eventually settled in rural New York, where she worked in an apple processing plant. Like many other self-taught artists, Walker turned to artmaking after a traumatic experience: she began to draw in the late 1960s or early 1970s while in prison for the manslaughter of an abusive male friend. To escape the loneliness and monotony of prison life, Walker drew numerous portraits of fashionably dressed and meticulously groomed men and women. After her release in 1972, Walker further developed her distinctive style, which is characterized by bold draftsmanship and inventive patterning.—from the American Folk Art Museum Women’s Outsider Art, Part VI:
Inez Nathaniel Walker
Born in South Carolina in 1911, Inez Nathaniel Walker joined the African American migration to the North in the 1930s. She eventually settled in rural New York, where she worked in an apple processing plant. Like many other self-taught artists, Walker turned to artmaking after a traumatic experience: she began to draw in the late 1960s or early 1970s while in prison for the manslaughter of an abusive male friend. To escape the loneliness and monotony of prison life, Walker drew numerous portraits of fashionably dressed and meticulously groomed men and women. After her release in 1972, Walker further developed her distinctive style, which is characterized by bold draftsmanship and inventive patterning.—from the American Folk Art Museum Women’s Outsider Art, Part VI:
Inez Nathaniel Walker
Born in South Carolina in 1911, Inez Nathaniel Walker joined the African American migration to the North in the 1930s. She eventually settled in rural New York, where she worked in an apple processing plant. Like many other self-taught artists, Walker turned to artmaking after a traumatic experience: she began to draw in the late 1960s or early 1970s while in prison for the manslaughter of an abusive male friend. To escape the loneliness and monotony of prison life, Walker drew numerous portraits of fashionably dressed and meticulously groomed men and women. After her release in 1972, Walker further developed her distinctive style, which is characterized by bold draftsmanship and inventive patterning.—from the American Folk Art Museum Women’s Outsider Art, Part VI:
Inez Nathaniel Walker
Born in South Carolina in 1911, Inez Nathaniel Walker joined the African American migration to the North in the 1930s. She eventually settled in rural New York, where she worked in an apple processing plant. Like many other self-taught artists, Walker turned to artmaking after a traumatic experience: she began to draw in the late 1960s or early 1970s while in prison for the manslaughter of an abusive male friend. To escape the loneliness and monotony of prison life, Walker drew numerous portraits of fashionably dressed and meticulously groomed men and women. After her release in 1972, Walker further developed her distinctive style, which is characterized by bold draftsmanship and inventive patterning.—from the American Folk Art Museum Women’s Outsider Art, Part VI:
Inez Nathaniel Walker
Born in South Carolina in 1911, Inez Nathaniel Walker joined the African American migration to the North in the 1930s. She eventually settled in rural New York, where she worked in an apple processing plant. Like many other self-taught artists, Walker turned to artmaking after a traumatic experience: she began to draw in the late 1960s or early 1970s while in prison for the manslaughter of an abusive male friend. To escape the loneliness and monotony of prison life, Walker drew numerous portraits of fashionably dressed and meticulously groomed men and women. After her release in 1972, Walker further developed her distinctive style, which is characterized by bold draftsmanship and inventive patterning.—from the American Folk Art Museum Women’s Outsider Art, Part VI:
Inez Nathaniel Walker
Born in South Carolina in 1911, Inez Nathaniel Walker joined the African American migration to the North in the 1930s. She eventually settled in rural New York, where she worked in an apple processing plant. Like many other self-taught artists, Walker turned to artmaking after a traumatic experience: she began to draw in the late 1960s or early 1970s while in prison for the manslaughter of an abusive male friend. To escape the loneliness and monotony of prison life, Walker drew numerous portraits of fashionably dressed and meticulously groomed men and women. After her release in 1972, Walker further developed her distinctive style, which is characterized by bold draftsmanship and inventive patterning.—from the American Folk Art Museum Women’s Outsider Art, Part VI:
Inez Nathaniel Walker
Born in South Carolina in 1911, Inez Nathaniel Walker joined the African American migration to the North in the 1930s. She eventually settled in rural New York, where she worked in an apple processing plant. Like many other self-taught artists, Walker turned to artmaking after a traumatic experience: she began to draw in the late 1960s or early 1970s while in prison for the manslaughter of an abusive male friend. To escape the loneliness and monotony of prison life, Walker drew numerous portraits of fashionably dressed and meticulously groomed men and women. After her release in 1972, Walker further developed her distinctive style, which is characterized by bold draftsmanship and inventive patterning.—from the American Folk Art Museum Women’s Outsider Art, Part VI:
Inez Nathaniel Walker
Born in South Carolina in 1911, Inez Nathaniel Walker joined the African American migration to the North in the 1930s. She eventually settled in rural New York, where she worked in an apple processing plant. Like many other self-taught artists, Walker turned to artmaking after a traumatic experience: she began to draw in the late 1960s or early 1970s while in prison for the manslaughter of an abusive male friend. To escape the loneliness and monotony of prison life, Walker drew numerous portraits of fashionably dressed and meticulously groomed men and women. After her release in 1972, Walker further developed her distinctive style, which is characterized by bold draftsmanship and inventive patterning.—from the American Folk Art Museum Women’s Outsider Art, Part VI:
Inez Nathaniel Walker
Born in South Carolina in 1911, Inez Nathaniel Walker joined the African American migration to the North in the 1930s. She eventually settled in rural New York, where she worked in an apple processing plant. Like many other self-taught artists, Walker turned to artmaking after a traumatic experience: she began to draw in the late 1960s or early 1970s while in prison for the manslaughter of an abusive male friend. To escape the loneliness and monotony of prison life, Walker drew numerous portraits of fashionably dressed and meticulously groomed men and women. After her release in 1972, Walker further developed her distinctive style, which is characterized by bold draftsmanship and inventive patterning.—from the American Folk Art Museum Women’s Outsider Art, Part VI:
Inez Nathaniel Walker
Born in South Carolina in 1911, Inez Nathaniel Walker joined the African American migration to the North in the 1930s. She eventually settled in rural New York, where she worked in an apple processing plant. Like many other self-taught artists, Walker turned to artmaking after a traumatic experience: she began to draw in the late 1960s or early 1970s while in prison for the manslaughter of an abusive male friend. To escape the loneliness and monotony of prison life, Walker drew numerous portraits of fashionably dressed and meticulously groomed men and women. After her release in 1972, Walker further developed her distinctive style, which is characterized by bold draftsmanship and inventive patterning.—from the American Folk Art Museum

Women’s Outsider Art, Part VI:

Inez Nathaniel Walker

Born in South Carolina in 1911, Inez Nathaniel Walker joined the African American migration to the North in the 1930s. She eventually settled in rural New York, where she worked in an apple processing plant. Like many other self-taught artists, Walker turned to artmaking after a traumatic experience: she began to draw in the late 1960s or early 1970s while in prison for the manslaughter of an abusive male friend. To escape the loneliness and monotony of prison life, Walker drew numerous portraits of fashionably dressed and meticulously groomed men and women. After her release in 1972, Walker further developed her distinctive style, which is characterized by bold draftsmanship and inventive patterning.

—from the American Folk Art Museum

Women’s Outsider Art, Part V:
Nellie Mae Rowe
Rowe was born in 1900 in Georgia. Burdened by financial pressures, she left school after the fourth grade to work in the fields with her father, Sam Williams.  While Rowe displayed an early interest in drawing and fashioning dolls out of left over cloth, it wasn’t until the death of her second husband that her artistic talents came to fruition. Rowe’s living space – her home and yard – served as her first canvas and installation project. There, recycled and discarded materials became works of art. Scraps of wood and chewing gum became dolls and sculptures. Soon she turned to drawing and painting.During final years of her life, Rowe’s artistic career culminated in nationwide attention and considerable financial success.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part V:
Nellie Mae Rowe
Rowe was born in 1900 in Georgia. Burdened by financial pressures, she left school after the fourth grade to work in the fields with her father, Sam Williams.  While Rowe displayed an early interest in drawing and fashioning dolls out of left over cloth, it wasn’t until the death of her second husband that her artistic talents came to fruition. Rowe’s living space – her home and yard – served as her first canvas and installation project. There, recycled and discarded materials became works of art. Scraps of wood and chewing gum became dolls and sculptures. Soon she turned to drawing and painting.During final years of her life, Rowe’s artistic career culminated in nationwide attention and considerable financial success.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part V:
Nellie Mae Rowe
Rowe was born in 1900 in Georgia. Burdened by financial pressures, she left school after the fourth grade to work in the fields with her father, Sam Williams.  While Rowe displayed an early interest in drawing and fashioning dolls out of left over cloth, it wasn’t until the death of her second husband that her artistic talents came to fruition. Rowe’s living space – her home and yard – served as her first canvas and installation project. There, recycled and discarded materials became works of art. Scraps of wood and chewing gum became dolls and sculptures. Soon she turned to drawing and painting.During final years of her life, Rowe’s artistic career culminated in nationwide attention and considerable financial success.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part V:
Nellie Mae Rowe
Rowe was born in 1900 in Georgia. Burdened by financial pressures, she left school after the fourth grade to work in the fields with her father, Sam Williams.  While Rowe displayed an early interest in drawing and fashioning dolls out of left over cloth, it wasn’t until the death of her second husband that her artistic talents came to fruition. Rowe’s living space – her home and yard – served as her first canvas and installation project. There, recycled and discarded materials became works of art. Scraps of wood and chewing gum became dolls and sculptures. Soon she turned to drawing and painting.During final years of her life, Rowe’s artistic career culminated in nationwide attention and considerable financial success.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part V:
Nellie Mae Rowe
Rowe was born in 1900 in Georgia. Burdened by financial pressures, she left school after the fourth grade to work in the fields with her father, Sam Williams.  While Rowe displayed an early interest in drawing and fashioning dolls out of left over cloth, it wasn’t until the death of her second husband that her artistic talents came to fruition. Rowe’s living space – her home and yard – served as her first canvas and installation project. There, recycled and discarded materials became works of art. Scraps of wood and chewing gum became dolls and sculptures. Soon she turned to drawing and painting.During final years of her life, Rowe’s artistic career culminated in nationwide attention and considerable financial success.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part V:
Nellie Mae Rowe
Rowe was born in 1900 in Georgia. Burdened by financial pressures, she left school after the fourth grade to work in the fields with her father, Sam Williams.  While Rowe displayed an early interest in drawing and fashioning dolls out of left over cloth, it wasn’t until the death of her second husband that her artistic talents came to fruition. Rowe’s living space – her home and yard – served as her first canvas and installation project. There, recycled and discarded materials became works of art. Scraps of wood and chewing gum became dolls and sculptures. Soon she turned to drawing and painting.During final years of her life, Rowe’s artistic career culminated in nationwide attention and considerable financial success.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part V:
Nellie Mae Rowe
Rowe was born in 1900 in Georgia. Burdened by financial pressures, she left school after the fourth grade to work in the fields with her father, Sam Williams.  While Rowe displayed an early interest in drawing and fashioning dolls out of left over cloth, it wasn’t until the death of her second husband that her artistic talents came to fruition. Rowe’s living space – her home and yard – served as her first canvas and installation project. There, recycled and discarded materials became works of art. Scraps of wood and chewing gum became dolls and sculptures. Soon she turned to drawing and painting.During final years of her life, Rowe’s artistic career culminated in nationwide attention and considerable financial success.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part V:
Nellie Mae Rowe
Rowe was born in 1900 in Georgia. Burdened by financial pressures, she left school after the fourth grade to work in the fields with her father, Sam Williams.  While Rowe displayed an early interest in drawing and fashioning dolls out of left over cloth, it wasn’t until the death of her second husband that her artistic talents came to fruition. Rowe’s living space – her home and yard – served as her first canvas and installation project. There, recycled and discarded materials became works of art. Scraps of wood and chewing gum became dolls and sculptures. Soon she turned to drawing and painting.During final years of her life, Rowe’s artistic career culminated in nationwide attention and considerable financial success.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part V:
Nellie Mae Rowe
Rowe was born in 1900 in Georgia. Burdened by financial pressures, she left school after the fourth grade to work in the fields with her father, Sam Williams.  While Rowe displayed an early interest in drawing and fashioning dolls out of left over cloth, it wasn’t until the death of her second husband that her artistic talents came to fruition. Rowe’s living space – her home and yard – served as her first canvas and installation project. There, recycled and discarded materials became works of art. Scraps of wood and chewing gum became dolls and sculptures. Soon she turned to drawing and painting.During final years of her life, Rowe’s artistic career culminated in nationwide attention and considerable financial success.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part V:
Nellie Mae Rowe
Rowe was born in 1900 in Georgia. Burdened by financial pressures, she left school after the fourth grade to work in the fields with her father, Sam Williams.  While Rowe displayed an early interest in drawing and fashioning dolls out of left over cloth, it wasn’t until the death of her second husband that her artistic talents came to fruition. Rowe’s living space – her home and yard – served as her first canvas and installation project. There, recycled and discarded materials became works of art. Scraps of wood and chewing gum became dolls and sculptures. Soon she turned to drawing and painting.During final years of her life, Rowe’s artistic career culminated in nationwide attention and considerable financial success.
—from Wikipedia

Women’s Outsider Art, Part V:

Nellie Mae Rowe

Rowe was born in 1900 in Georgia. Burdened by financial pressures, she left school after the fourth grade to work in the fields with her father, Sam Williams. While Rowe displayed an early interest in drawing and fashioning dolls out of left over cloth, it wasn’t until the death of her second husband that her artistic talents came to fruition. Rowe’s living space – her home and yard – served as her first canvas and installation project. There, recycled and discarded materials became works of art. Scraps of wood and chewing gum became dolls and sculptures. Soon she turned to drawing and painting.During final years of her life, Rowe’s artistic career culminated in nationwide attention and considerable financial success.

—from Wikipedia

Women’s Outsider Art, Part IV:
Judith Scott
Judith Scott was born in Ohio in 1943. She was born profoundly deaf, mute, and with down syndrome. On medical advice, her parents placed her in an institution for the mentally retarded. In 1985, her twin sister became her legal guardian. After working at the Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, California, she became an internationally renowned fiber artist. She died at the age of 51.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IV:
Judith Scott
Judith Scott was born in Ohio in 1943. She was born profoundly deaf, mute, and with down syndrome. On medical advice, her parents placed her in an institution for the mentally retarded. In 1985, her twin sister became her legal guardian. After working at the Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, California, she became an internationally renowned fiber artist. She died at the age of 51.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IV:
Judith Scott
Judith Scott was born in Ohio in 1943. She was born profoundly deaf, mute, and with down syndrome. On medical advice, her parents placed her in an institution for the mentally retarded. In 1985, her twin sister became her legal guardian. After working at the Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, California, she became an internationally renowned fiber artist. She died at the age of 51.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IV:
Judith Scott
Judith Scott was born in Ohio in 1943. She was born profoundly deaf, mute, and with down syndrome. On medical advice, her parents placed her in an institution for the mentally retarded. In 1985, her twin sister became her legal guardian. After working at the Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, California, she became an internationally renowned fiber artist. She died at the age of 51.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IV:
Judith Scott
Judith Scott was born in Ohio in 1943. She was born profoundly deaf, mute, and with down syndrome. On medical advice, her parents placed her in an institution for the mentally retarded. In 1985, her twin sister became her legal guardian. After working at the Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, California, she became an internationally renowned fiber artist. She died at the age of 51.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IV:
Judith Scott
Judith Scott was born in Ohio in 1943. She was born profoundly deaf, mute, and with down syndrome. On medical advice, her parents placed her in an institution for the mentally retarded. In 1985, her twin sister became her legal guardian. After working at the Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, California, she became an internationally renowned fiber artist. She died at the age of 51.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IV:
Judith Scott
Judith Scott was born in Ohio in 1943. She was born profoundly deaf, mute, and with down syndrome. On medical advice, her parents placed her in an institution for the mentally retarded. In 1985, her twin sister became her legal guardian. After working at the Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, California, she became an internationally renowned fiber artist. She died at the age of 51.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IV:
Judith Scott
Judith Scott was born in Ohio in 1943. She was born profoundly deaf, mute, and with down syndrome. On medical advice, her parents placed her in an institution for the mentally retarded. In 1985, her twin sister became her legal guardian. After working at the Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, California, she became an internationally renowned fiber artist. She died at the age of 51.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IV:
Judith Scott
Judith Scott was born in Ohio in 1943. She was born profoundly deaf, mute, and with down syndrome. On medical advice, her parents placed her in an institution for the mentally retarded. In 1985, her twin sister became her legal guardian. After working at the Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, California, she became an internationally renowned fiber artist. She died at the age of 51.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IV:
Judith Scott
Judith Scott was born in Ohio in 1943. She was born profoundly deaf, mute, and with down syndrome. On medical advice, her parents placed her in an institution for the mentally retarded. In 1985, her twin sister became her legal guardian. After working at the Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, California, she became an internationally renowned fiber artist. She died at the age of 51.
—from Wikipedia

Women’s Outsider Art, Part IV:

Judith Scott

Judith Scott was born in Ohio in 1943. She was born profoundly deaf, mute, and with down syndrome. On medical advice, her parents placed her in an institution for the mentally retarded. In 1985, her twin sister became her legal guardian. After working at the Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, California, she became an internationally renowned fiber artist. She died at the age of 51.

—from Wikipedia

Women’s Outsider Art, Part III:
Eileen Doman
Except for coloring hair and painting fingernails at a Genoa, Illinois beauty salon where she had been employed, Eileen Doman had never shown much of a predeliction for art. In the early 1990s, though, when she was nearing 40, she decided to try painting. Her life was to be quickly and radically transformed. By 1992, after her work was given exposure at the New York Outsider Art Fair, she was hailed as a major discovery. The people of Eileen Doman’s paintings are relatives and family friends, stopped in time, forty, fifty and more years ago. Most of the paintings spring from old family photographs. 
—from Dean Jensen Gallery Women’s Outsider Art, Part III:
Eileen Doman
Except for coloring hair and painting fingernails at a Genoa, Illinois beauty salon where she had been employed, Eileen Doman had never shown much of a predeliction for art. In the early 1990s, though, when she was nearing 40, she decided to try painting. Her life was to be quickly and radically transformed. By 1992, after her work was given exposure at the New York Outsider Art Fair, she was hailed as a major discovery. The people of Eileen Doman’s paintings are relatives and family friends, stopped in time, forty, fifty and more years ago. Most of the paintings spring from old family photographs. 
—from Dean Jensen Gallery Women’s Outsider Art, Part III:
Eileen Doman
Except for coloring hair and painting fingernails at a Genoa, Illinois beauty salon where she had been employed, Eileen Doman had never shown much of a predeliction for art. In the early 1990s, though, when she was nearing 40, she decided to try painting. Her life was to be quickly and radically transformed. By 1992, after her work was given exposure at the New York Outsider Art Fair, she was hailed as a major discovery. The people of Eileen Doman’s paintings are relatives and family friends, stopped in time, forty, fifty and more years ago. Most of the paintings spring from old family photographs. 
—from Dean Jensen Gallery Women’s Outsider Art, Part III:
Eileen Doman
Except for coloring hair and painting fingernails at a Genoa, Illinois beauty salon where she had been employed, Eileen Doman had never shown much of a predeliction for art. In the early 1990s, though, when she was nearing 40, she decided to try painting. Her life was to be quickly and radically transformed. By 1992, after her work was given exposure at the New York Outsider Art Fair, she was hailed as a major discovery. The people of Eileen Doman’s paintings are relatives and family friends, stopped in time, forty, fifty and more years ago. Most of the paintings spring from old family photographs. 
—from Dean Jensen Gallery Women’s Outsider Art, Part III:
Eileen Doman
Except for coloring hair and painting fingernails at a Genoa, Illinois beauty salon where she had been employed, Eileen Doman had never shown much of a predeliction for art. In the early 1990s, though, when she was nearing 40, she decided to try painting. Her life was to be quickly and radically transformed. By 1992, after her work was given exposure at the New York Outsider Art Fair, she was hailed as a major discovery. The people of Eileen Doman’s paintings are relatives and family friends, stopped in time, forty, fifty and more years ago. Most of the paintings spring from old family photographs. 
—from Dean Jensen Gallery Women’s Outsider Art, Part III:
Eileen Doman
Except for coloring hair and painting fingernails at a Genoa, Illinois beauty salon where she had been employed, Eileen Doman had never shown much of a predeliction for art. In the early 1990s, though, when she was nearing 40, she decided to try painting. Her life was to be quickly and radically transformed. By 1992, after her work was given exposure at the New York Outsider Art Fair, she was hailed as a major discovery. The people of Eileen Doman’s paintings are relatives and family friends, stopped in time, forty, fifty and more years ago. Most of the paintings spring from old family photographs. 
—from Dean Jensen Gallery Women’s Outsider Art, Part III:
Eileen Doman
Except for coloring hair and painting fingernails at a Genoa, Illinois beauty salon where she had been employed, Eileen Doman had never shown much of a predeliction for art. In the early 1990s, though, when she was nearing 40, she decided to try painting. Her life was to be quickly and radically transformed. By 1992, after her work was given exposure at the New York Outsider Art Fair, she was hailed as a major discovery. The people of Eileen Doman’s paintings are relatives and family friends, stopped in time, forty, fifty and more years ago. Most of the paintings spring from old family photographs. 
—from Dean Jensen Gallery Women’s Outsider Art, Part III:
Eileen Doman
Except for coloring hair and painting fingernails at a Genoa, Illinois beauty salon where she had been employed, Eileen Doman had never shown much of a predeliction for art. In the early 1990s, though, when she was nearing 40, she decided to try painting. Her life was to be quickly and radically transformed. By 1992, after her work was given exposure at the New York Outsider Art Fair, she was hailed as a major discovery. The people of Eileen Doman’s paintings are relatives and family friends, stopped in time, forty, fifty and more years ago. Most of the paintings spring from old family photographs. 
—from Dean Jensen Gallery Women’s Outsider Art, Part III:
Eileen Doman
Except for coloring hair and painting fingernails at a Genoa, Illinois beauty salon where she had been employed, Eileen Doman had never shown much of a predeliction for art. In the early 1990s, though, when she was nearing 40, she decided to try painting. Her life was to be quickly and radically transformed. By 1992, after her work was given exposure at the New York Outsider Art Fair, she was hailed as a major discovery. The people of Eileen Doman’s paintings are relatives and family friends, stopped in time, forty, fifty and more years ago. Most of the paintings spring from old family photographs. 
—from Dean Jensen Gallery Women’s Outsider Art, Part III:
Eileen Doman
Except for coloring hair and painting fingernails at a Genoa, Illinois beauty salon where she had been employed, Eileen Doman had never shown much of a predeliction for art. In the early 1990s, though, when she was nearing 40, she decided to try painting. Her life was to be quickly and radically transformed. By 1992, after her work was given exposure at the New York Outsider Art Fair, she was hailed as a major discovery. The people of Eileen Doman’s paintings are relatives and family friends, stopped in time, forty, fifty and more years ago. Most of the paintings spring from old family photographs. 
—from Dean Jensen Gallery

Women’s Outsider Art, Part III:

Eileen Doman

Except for coloring hair and painting fingernails at a Genoa, Illinois beauty salon where she had been employed, Eileen Doman had never shown much of a predeliction for art. In the early 1990s, though, when she was nearing 40, she decided to try painting. Her life was to be quickly and radically transformed. By 1992, after her work was given exposure at the New York Outsider Art Fair, she was hailed as a major discovery. The people of Eileen Doman’s paintings are relatives and family friends, stopped in time, forty, fifty and more years ago. Most of the paintings spring from old family photographs.

—from Dean Jensen Gallery

Women’s Outsider Art, Part II:
Laura Craig McNellis
Laura Craig McNellis was born in Tennessee in 1957. McNellis’s mental retardation became apparent early in her life. Although there was some social pressure to institutionalize her, her family was determined that she grow up at home. McNellis has been painting regularly, using tempera on blank newsprint as her medium, since childhood. Because she is non-literate and her speech is understood only by family members, McNellis’s paintings have become an extraordinary means of personal expression. Often a painting portrays an event from her day, and sometimes a series of works will develop from a particular event that fascinated her. Her acute powers of observation enable her to depict eloquently the people, objects, and events she encounters every day. 
—from artspace.com Women’s Outsider Art, Part II:
Laura Craig McNellis
Laura Craig McNellis was born in Tennessee in 1957. McNellis’s mental retardation became apparent early in her life. Although there was some social pressure to institutionalize her, her family was determined that she grow up at home. McNellis has been painting regularly, using tempera on blank newsprint as her medium, since childhood. Because she is non-literate and her speech is understood only by family members, McNellis’s paintings have become an extraordinary means of personal expression. Often a painting portrays an event from her day, and sometimes a series of works will develop from a particular event that fascinated her. Her acute powers of observation enable her to depict eloquently the people, objects, and events she encounters every day. 
—from artspace.com Women’s Outsider Art, Part II:
Laura Craig McNellis
Laura Craig McNellis was born in Tennessee in 1957. McNellis’s mental retardation became apparent early in her life. Although there was some social pressure to institutionalize her, her family was determined that she grow up at home. McNellis has been painting regularly, using tempera on blank newsprint as her medium, since childhood. Because she is non-literate and her speech is understood only by family members, McNellis’s paintings have become an extraordinary means of personal expression. Often a painting portrays an event from her day, and sometimes a series of works will develop from a particular event that fascinated her. Her acute powers of observation enable her to depict eloquently the people, objects, and events she encounters every day. 
—from artspace.com Women’s Outsider Art, Part II:
Laura Craig McNellis
Laura Craig McNellis was born in Tennessee in 1957. McNellis’s mental retardation became apparent early in her life. Although there was some social pressure to institutionalize her, her family was determined that she grow up at home. McNellis has been painting regularly, using tempera on blank newsprint as her medium, since childhood. Because she is non-literate and her speech is understood only by family members, McNellis’s paintings have become an extraordinary means of personal expression. Often a painting portrays an event from her day, and sometimes a series of works will develop from a particular event that fascinated her. Her acute powers of observation enable her to depict eloquently the people, objects, and events she encounters every day. 
—from artspace.com Women’s Outsider Art, Part II:
Laura Craig McNellis
Laura Craig McNellis was born in Tennessee in 1957. McNellis’s mental retardation became apparent early in her life. Although there was some social pressure to institutionalize her, her family was determined that she grow up at home. McNellis has been painting regularly, using tempera on blank newsprint as her medium, since childhood. Because she is non-literate and her speech is understood only by family members, McNellis’s paintings have become an extraordinary means of personal expression. Often a painting portrays an event from her day, and sometimes a series of works will develop from a particular event that fascinated her. Her acute powers of observation enable her to depict eloquently the people, objects, and events she encounters every day. 
—from artspace.com Women’s Outsider Art, Part II:
Laura Craig McNellis
Laura Craig McNellis was born in Tennessee in 1957. McNellis’s mental retardation became apparent early in her life. Although there was some social pressure to institutionalize her, her family was determined that she grow up at home. McNellis has been painting regularly, using tempera on blank newsprint as her medium, since childhood. Because she is non-literate and her speech is understood only by family members, McNellis’s paintings have become an extraordinary means of personal expression. Often a painting portrays an event from her day, and sometimes a series of works will develop from a particular event that fascinated her. Her acute powers of observation enable her to depict eloquently the people, objects, and events she encounters every day. 
—from artspace.com Women’s Outsider Art, Part II:
Laura Craig McNellis
Laura Craig McNellis was born in Tennessee in 1957. McNellis’s mental retardation became apparent early in her life. Although there was some social pressure to institutionalize her, her family was determined that she grow up at home. McNellis has been painting regularly, using tempera on blank newsprint as her medium, since childhood. Because she is non-literate and her speech is understood only by family members, McNellis’s paintings have become an extraordinary means of personal expression. Often a painting portrays an event from her day, and sometimes a series of works will develop from a particular event that fascinated her. Her acute powers of observation enable her to depict eloquently the people, objects, and events she encounters every day. 
—from artspace.com Women’s Outsider Art, Part II:
Laura Craig McNellis
Laura Craig McNellis was born in Tennessee in 1957. McNellis’s mental retardation became apparent early in her life. Although there was some social pressure to institutionalize her, her family was determined that she grow up at home. McNellis has been painting regularly, using tempera on blank newsprint as her medium, since childhood. Because she is non-literate and her speech is understood only by family members, McNellis’s paintings have become an extraordinary means of personal expression. Often a painting portrays an event from her day, and sometimes a series of works will develop from a particular event that fascinated her. Her acute powers of observation enable her to depict eloquently the people, objects, and events she encounters every day. 
—from artspace.com Women’s Outsider Art, Part II:
Laura Craig McNellis
Laura Craig McNellis was born in Tennessee in 1957. McNellis’s mental retardation became apparent early in her life. Although there was some social pressure to institutionalize her, her family was determined that she grow up at home. McNellis has been painting regularly, using tempera on blank newsprint as her medium, since childhood. Because she is non-literate and her speech is understood only by family members, McNellis’s paintings have become an extraordinary means of personal expression. Often a painting portrays an event from her day, and sometimes a series of works will develop from a particular event that fascinated her. Her acute powers of observation enable her to depict eloquently the people, objects, and events she encounters every day. 
—from artspace.com Women’s Outsider Art, Part II:
Laura Craig McNellis
Laura Craig McNellis was born in Tennessee in 1957. McNellis’s mental retardation became apparent early in her life. Although there was some social pressure to institutionalize her, her family was determined that she grow up at home. McNellis has been painting regularly, using tempera on blank newsprint as her medium, since childhood. Because she is non-literate and her speech is understood only by family members, McNellis’s paintings have become an extraordinary means of personal expression. Often a painting portrays an event from her day, and sometimes a series of works will develop from a particular event that fascinated her. Her acute powers of observation enable her to depict eloquently the people, objects, and events she encounters every day. 
—from artspace.com

Women’s Outsider Art, Part II:

Laura Craig McNellis

Laura Craig McNellis was born in Tennessee in 1957. McNellis’s mental retardation became apparent early in her life. Although there was some social pressure to institutionalize her, her family was determined that she grow up at home. McNellis has been painting regularly, using tempera on blank newsprint as her medium, since childhood. Because she is non-literate and her speech is understood only by family members, McNellis’s paintings have become an extraordinary means of personal expression. Often a painting portrays an event from her day, and sometimes a series of works will develop from a particular event that fascinated her. Her acute powers of observation enable her to depict eloquently the people, objects, and events she encounters every day.

—from artspace.com

Women’s Outsider Art, Part I: 
Sister Gertrude Morgan 
Born in 1900 in Alabama, Sister Morgan was a preacher, missionary, artist, musician, and poet who worked in New Orleans in the 1960s and ’70s. At the age of 38 she heard a voice from God telling her to become a street evangelist. She left her family and husband to move to New Orleans, where she organized an orphanage with two other missionaries. She painted in order to create visual aids for her preaching, and her paintings use a colorful religious iconography. Some of her favorite subjects are the Book of Revelation and her and Jesus flying in an airplane, this last accompanied by the poem “Jesus is my air Plane.” She painted on whatever was at hand, including styrofoam trays, window shades and even toilet paper rolls. She died in 1980.

—from the Wikipedia entry on Sister Morgan Gertrude Women’s Outsider Art, Part I: 
Sister Gertrude Morgan 
Born in 1900 in Alabama, Sister Morgan was a preacher, missionary, artist, musician, and poet who worked in New Orleans in the 1960s and ’70s. At the age of 38 she heard a voice from God telling her to become a street evangelist. She left her family and husband to move to New Orleans, where she organized an orphanage with two other missionaries. She painted in order to create visual aids for her preaching, and her paintings use a colorful religious iconography. Some of her favorite subjects are the Book of Revelation and her and Jesus flying in an airplane, this last accompanied by the poem “Jesus is my air Plane.” She painted on whatever was at hand, including styrofoam trays, window shades and even toilet paper rolls. She died in 1980.

—from the Wikipedia entry on Sister Morgan Gertrude Women’s Outsider Art, Part I: 
Sister Gertrude Morgan 
Born in 1900 in Alabama, Sister Morgan was a preacher, missionary, artist, musician, and poet who worked in New Orleans in the 1960s and ’70s. At the age of 38 she heard a voice from God telling her to become a street evangelist. She left her family and husband to move to New Orleans, where she organized an orphanage with two other missionaries. She painted in order to create visual aids for her preaching, and her paintings use a colorful religious iconography. Some of her favorite subjects are the Book of Revelation and her and Jesus flying in an airplane, this last accompanied by the poem “Jesus is my air Plane.” She painted on whatever was at hand, including styrofoam trays, window shades and even toilet paper rolls. She died in 1980.

—from the Wikipedia entry on Sister Morgan Gertrude Women’s Outsider Art, Part I: 
Sister Gertrude Morgan 
Born in 1900 in Alabama, Sister Morgan was a preacher, missionary, artist, musician, and poet who worked in New Orleans in the 1960s and ’70s. At the age of 38 she heard a voice from God telling her to become a street evangelist. She left her family and husband to move to New Orleans, where she organized an orphanage with two other missionaries. She painted in order to create visual aids for her preaching, and her paintings use a colorful religious iconography. Some of her favorite subjects are the Book of Revelation and her and Jesus flying in an airplane, this last accompanied by the poem “Jesus is my air Plane.” She painted on whatever was at hand, including styrofoam trays, window shades and even toilet paper rolls. She died in 1980.

—from the Wikipedia entry on Sister Morgan Gertrude Women’s Outsider Art, Part I: 
Sister Gertrude Morgan 
Born in 1900 in Alabama, Sister Morgan was a preacher, missionary, artist, musician, and poet who worked in New Orleans in the 1960s and ’70s. At the age of 38 she heard a voice from God telling her to become a street evangelist. She left her family and husband to move to New Orleans, where she organized an orphanage with two other missionaries. She painted in order to create visual aids for her preaching, and her paintings use a colorful religious iconography. Some of her favorite subjects are the Book of Revelation and her and Jesus flying in an airplane, this last accompanied by the poem “Jesus is my air Plane.” She painted on whatever was at hand, including styrofoam trays, window shades and even toilet paper rolls. She died in 1980.

—from the Wikipedia entry on Sister Morgan Gertrude Women’s Outsider Art, Part I: 
Sister Gertrude Morgan 
Born in 1900 in Alabama, Sister Morgan was a preacher, missionary, artist, musician, and poet who worked in New Orleans in the 1960s and ’70s. At the age of 38 she heard a voice from God telling her to become a street evangelist. She left her family and husband to move to New Orleans, where she organized an orphanage with two other missionaries. She painted in order to create visual aids for her preaching, and her paintings use a colorful religious iconography. Some of her favorite subjects are the Book of Revelation and her and Jesus flying in an airplane, this last accompanied by the poem “Jesus is my air Plane.” She painted on whatever was at hand, including styrofoam trays, window shades and even toilet paper rolls. She died in 1980.

—from the Wikipedia entry on Sister Morgan Gertrude Women’s Outsider Art, Part I: 
Sister Gertrude Morgan 
Born in 1900 in Alabama, Sister Morgan was a preacher, missionary, artist, musician, and poet who worked in New Orleans in the 1960s and ’70s. At the age of 38 she heard a voice from God telling her to become a street evangelist. She left her family and husband to move to New Orleans, where she organized an orphanage with two other missionaries. She painted in order to create visual aids for her preaching, and her paintings use a colorful religious iconography. Some of her favorite subjects are the Book of Revelation and her and Jesus flying in an airplane, this last accompanied by the poem “Jesus is my air Plane.” She painted on whatever was at hand, including styrofoam trays, window shades and even toilet paper rolls. She died in 1980.

—from the Wikipedia entry on Sister Morgan Gertrude Women’s Outsider Art, Part I: 
Sister Gertrude Morgan 
Born in 1900 in Alabama, Sister Morgan was a preacher, missionary, artist, musician, and poet who worked in New Orleans in the 1960s and ’70s. At the age of 38 she heard a voice from God telling her to become a street evangelist. She left her family and husband to move to New Orleans, where she organized an orphanage with two other missionaries. She painted in order to create visual aids for her preaching, and her paintings use a colorful religious iconography. Some of her favorite subjects are the Book of Revelation and her and Jesus flying in an airplane, this last accompanied by the poem “Jesus is my air Plane.” She painted on whatever was at hand, including styrofoam trays, window shades and even toilet paper rolls. She died in 1980.

—from the Wikipedia entry on Sister Morgan Gertrude Women’s Outsider Art, Part I: 
Sister Gertrude Morgan 
Born in 1900 in Alabama, Sister Morgan was a preacher, missionary, artist, musician, and poet who worked in New Orleans in the 1960s and ’70s. At the age of 38 she heard a voice from God telling her to become a street evangelist. She left her family and husband to move to New Orleans, where she organized an orphanage with two other missionaries. She painted in order to create visual aids for her preaching, and her paintings use a colorful religious iconography. Some of her favorite subjects are the Book of Revelation and her and Jesus flying in an airplane, this last accompanied by the poem “Jesus is my air Plane.” She painted on whatever was at hand, including styrofoam trays, window shades and even toilet paper rolls. She died in 1980.

—from the Wikipedia entry on Sister Morgan Gertrude Women’s Outsider Art, Part I: 
Sister Gertrude Morgan 
Born in 1900 in Alabama, Sister Morgan was a preacher, missionary, artist, musician, and poet who worked in New Orleans in the 1960s and ’70s. At the age of 38 she heard a voice from God telling her to become a street evangelist. She left her family and husband to move to New Orleans, where she organized an orphanage with two other missionaries. She painted in order to create visual aids for her preaching, and her paintings use a colorful religious iconography. Some of her favorite subjects are the Book of Revelation and her and Jesus flying in an airplane, this last accompanied by the poem “Jesus is my air Plane.” She painted on whatever was at hand, including styrofoam trays, window shades and even toilet paper rolls. She died in 1980.

—from the Wikipedia entry on Sister Morgan Gertrude

Women’s Outsider Art, Part I:

Sister Gertrude Morgan

Born in 1900 in Alabama, Sister Morgan was a preacher, missionary, artist, musician, and poet who worked in New Orleans in the 1960s and ’70s. At the age of 38 she heard a voice from God telling her to become a street evangelist. She left her family and husband to move to New Orleans, where she organized an orphanage with two other missionaries. She painted in order to create visual aids for her preaching, and her paintings use a colorful religious iconography. Some of her favorite subjects are the Book of Revelation and her and Jesus flying in an airplane, this last accompanied by the poem “Jesus is my air Plane.” She painted on whatever was at hand, including styrofoam trays, window shades and even toilet paper rolls. She died in 1980.

—from the Wikipedia entry on Sister Morgan Gertrude

isqineeha:

Palestinian Spring - Palestinian Artist LAILA SHAWA

(via urbanadalet)

fleurdulys:

Church at Belgodere, Corsica - Suzanne Valadon

1913

Lee Godie (1908–1994) was an American self-taught artist who lived most of her life in Chicago. Lee Godie was born Jamot Emily Godie. She later married and had three children, but following the death of two of her children and the failure of her marriage she found herself living on the streets of Chicago. Godie could be seen on the steps of the Art Institute of Chicago arriving on the scene in 1968 selling her canvases to passerby. She worked in a variety of mediums which included watercolor, pencil, tempera, ballpoint pen, and crayon and on a number of surfaces such as canvas, poster board, sheets of paper and discarded window blinds. Some of her works were several pieces stitched together in the fashion of a triptych or book. Also included in the array of art works Godie created are the black-and-white snapshots from photo booths she took of herself dressed up in different personae. She would take these photos and embellish certain parts of them, adding color to her lips or nails or painting on darker eyebrows.
Godie was a self-styled French Impressionist with the belief in her work as being as significant as Paul Cézanne. She was particular about who she sold her art to and even to whom she talked to. Her fashion style was just as unique as her personality, and she could be seen wearing different swatches of fabric wrapped around herself or fur coats that were pieced together.
Lee Godie remained in downtown Chicago for almost a 30-year period, becoming a facet to the social milieu during that time. Eventually Godie was reunited with her daughter Bonnie Blank, who moved her out to the suburbs to live with her. On August 28, 1991, Chicago’s Mayor Daley proclaimed September “Lee Godie Exhibition Month”. Between March 13, 1993 and January 16, 2004, an exhibition entitled “Artist Lee Godie: A Twenty-Year Retrospective”, curated by Michael Bonesteel, who wrote the “Lee Godie” article in Raw Vision magazine, was presented at the Chicago Cultural Center. From September 12, 2008 to January 3, 2009, an exhibition of over 100 pieces of Lee Godie’s work entitled “Finding Beauty: The Art of Lee Godie” was on exhibit at Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art. Her work can be found in the permanent collections of the Museum of American Folk Art in New York City, the Milwaukee Art Museum, the Arkansas Arts Center and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago.
—from the Wikipedia entry on Lee Godie Lee Godie (1908–1994) was an American self-taught artist who lived most of her life in Chicago. Lee Godie was born Jamot Emily Godie. She later married and had three children, but following the death of two of her children and the failure of her marriage she found herself living on the streets of Chicago. Godie could be seen on the steps of the Art Institute of Chicago arriving on the scene in 1968 selling her canvases to passerby. She worked in a variety of mediums which included watercolor, pencil, tempera, ballpoint pen, and crayon and on a number of surfaces such as canvas, poster board, sheets of paper and discarded window blinds. Some of her works were several pieces stitched together in the fashion of a triptych or book. Also included in the array of art works Godie created are the black-and-white snapshots from photo booths she took of herself dressed up in different personae. She would take these photos and embellish certain parts of them, adding color to her lips or nails or painting on darker eyebrows.
Godie was a self-styled French Impressionist with the belief in her work as being as significant as Paul Cézanne. She was particular about who she sold her art to and even to whom she talked to. Her fashion style was just as unique as her personality, and she could be seen wearing different swatches of fabric wrapped around herself or fur coats that were pieced together.
Lee Godie remained in downtown Chicago for almost a 30-year period, becoming a facet to the social milieu during that time. Eventually Godie was reunited with her daughter Bonnie Blank, who moved her out to the suburbs to live with her. On August 28, 1991, Chicago’s Mayor Daley proclaimed September “Lee Godie Exhibition Month”. Between March 13, 1993 and January 16, 2004, an exhibition entitled “Artist Lee Godie: A Twenty-Year Retrospective”, curated by Michael Bonesteel, who wrote the “Lee Godie” article in Raw Vision magazine, was presented at the Chicago Cultural Center. From September 12, 2008 to January 3, 2009, an exhibition of over 100 pieces of Lee Godie’s work entitled “Finding Beauty: The Art of Lee Godie” was on exhibit at Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art. Her work can be found in the permanent collections of the Museum of American Folk Art in New York City, the Milwaukee Art Museum, the Arkansas Arts Center and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago.
—from the Wikipedia entry on Lee Godie Lee Godie (1908–1994) was an American self-taught artist who lived most of her life in Chicago. Lee Godie was born Jamot Emily Godie. She later married and had three children, but following the death of two of her children and the failure of her marriage she found herself living on the streets of Chicago. Godie could be seen on the steps of the Art Institute of Chicago arriving on the scene in 1968 selling her canvases to passerby. She worked in a variety of mediums which included watercolor, pencil, tempera, ballpoint pen, and crayon and on a number of surfaces such as canvas, poster board, sheets of paper and discarded window blinds. Some of her works were several pieces stitched together in the fashion of a triptych or book. Also included in the array of art works Godie created are the black-and-white snapshots from photo booths she took of herself dressed up in different personae. She would take these photos and embellish certain parts of them, adding color to her lips or nails or painting on darker eyebrows.
Godie was a self-styled French Impressionist with the belief in her work as being as significant as Paul Cézanne. She was particular about who she sold her art to and even to whom she talked to. Her fashion style was just as unique as her personality, and she could be seen wearing different swatches of fabric wrapped around herself or fur coats that were pieced together.
Lee Godie remained in downtown Chicago for almost a 30-year period, becoming a facet to the social milieu during that time. Eventually Godie was reunited with her daughter Bonnie Blank, who moved her out to the suburbs to live with her. On August 28, 1991, Chicago’s Mayor Daley proclaimed September “Lee Godie Exhibition Month”. Between March 13, 1993 and January 16, 2004, an exhibition entitled “Artist Lee Godie: A Twenty-Year Retrospective”, curated by Michael Bonesteel, who wrote the “Lee Godie” article in Raw Vision magazine, was presented at the Chicago Cultural Center. From September 12, 2008 to January 3, 2009, an exhibition of over 100 pieces of Lee Godie’s work entitled “Finding Beauty: The Art of Lee Godie” was on exhibit at Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art. Her work can be found in the permanent collections of the Museum of American Folk Art in New York City, the Milwaukee Art Museum, the Arkansas Arts Center and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago.
—from the Wikipedia entry on Lee Godie Lee Godie (1908–1994) was an American self-taught artist who lived most of her life in Chicago. Lee Godie was born Jamot Emily Godie. She later married and had three children, but following the death of two of her children and the failure of her marriage she found herself living on the streets of Chicago. Godie could be seen on the steps of the Art Institute of Chicago arriving on the scene in 1968 selling her canvases to passerby. She worked in a variety of mediums which included watercolor, pencil, tempera, ballpoint pen, and crayon and on a number of surfaces such as canvas, poster board, sheets of paper and discarded window blinds. Some of her works were several pieces stitched together in the fashion of a triptych or book. Also included in the array of art works Godie created are the black-and-white snapshots from photo booths she took of herself dressed up in different personae. She would take these photos and embellish certain parts of them, adding color to her lips or nails or painting on darker eyebrows.
Godie was a self-styled French Impressionist with the belief in her work as being as significant as Paul Cézanne. She was particular about who she sold her art to and even to whom she talked to. Her fashion style was just as unique as her personality, and she could be seen wearing different swatches of fabric wrapped around herself or fur coats that were pieced together.
Lee Godie remained in downtown Chicago for almost a 30-year period, becoming a facet to the social milieu during that time. Eventually Godie was reunited with her daughter Bonnie Blank, who moved her out to the suburbs to live with her. On August 28, 1991, Chicago’s Mayor Daley proclaimed September “Lee Godie Exhibition Month”. Between March 13, 1993 and January 16, 2004, an exhibition entitled “Artist Lee Godie: A Twenty-Year Retrospective”, curated by Michael Bonesteel, who wrote the “Lee Godie” article in Raw Vision magazine, was presented at the Chicago Cultural Center. From September 12, 2008 to January 3, 2009, an exhibition of over 100 pieces of Lee Godie’s work entitled “Finding Beauty: The Art of Lee Godie” was on exhibit at Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art. Her work can be found in the permanent collections of the Museum of American Folk Art in New York City, the Milwaukee Art Museum, the Arkansas Arts Center and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago.
—from the Wikipedia entry on Lee Godie Lee Godie (1908–1994) was an American self-taught artist who lived most of her life in Chicago. Lee Godie was born Jamot Emily Godie. She later married and had three children, but following the death of two of her children and the failure of her marriage she found herself living on the streets of Chicago. Godie could be seen on the steps of the Art Institute of Chicago arriving on the scene in 1968 selling her canvases to passerby. She worked in a variety of mediums which included watercolor, pencil, tempera, ballpoint pen, and crayon and on a number of surfaces such as canvas, poster board, sheets of paper and discarded window blinds. Some of her works were several pieces stitched together in the fashion of a triptych or book. Also included in the array of art works Godie created are the black-and-white snapshots from photo booths she took of herself dressed up in different personae. She would take these photos and embellish certain parts of them, adding color to her lips or nails or painting on darker eyebrows.
Godie was a self-styled French Impressionist with the belief in her work as being as significant as Paul Cézanne. She was particular about who she sold her art to and even to whom she talked to. Her fashion style was just as unique as her personality, and she could be seen wearing different swatches of fabric wrapped around herself or fur coats that were pieced together.
Lee Godie remained in downtown Chicago for almost a 30-year period, becoming a facet to the social milieu during that time. Eventually Godie was reunited with her daughter Bonnie Blank, who moved her out to the suburbs to live with her. On August 28, 1991, Chicago’s Mayor Daley proclaimed September “Lee Godie Exhibition Month”. Between March 13, 1993 and January 16, 2004, an exhibition entitled “Artist Lee Godie: A Twenty-Year Retrospective”, curated by Michael Bonesteel, who wrote the “Lee Godie” article in Raw Vision magazine, was presented at the Chicago Cultural Center. From September 12, 2008 to January 3, 2009, an exhibition of over 100 pieces of Lee Godie’s work entitled “Finding Beauty: The Art of Lee Godie” was on exhibit at Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art. Her work can be found in the permanent collections of the Museum of American Folk Art in New York City, the Milwaukee Art Museum, the Arkansas Arts Center and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago.
—from the Wikipedia entry on Lee Godie Lee Godie (1908–1994) was an American self-taught artist who lived most of her life in Chicago. Lee Godie was born Jamot Emily Godie. She later married and had three children, but following the death of two of her children and the failure of her marriage she found herself living on the streets of Chicago. Godie could be seen on the steps of the Art Institute of Chicago arriving on the scene in 1968 selling her canvases to passerby. She worked in a variety of mediums which included watercolor, pencil, tempera, ballpoint pen, and crayon and on a number of surfaces such as canvas, poster board, sheets of paper and discarded window blinds. Some of her works were several pieces stitched together in the fashion of a triptych or book. Also included in the array of art works Godie created are the black-and-white snapshots from photo booths she took of herself dressed up in different personae. She would take these photos and embellish certain parts of them, adding color to her lips or nails or painting on darker eyebrows.
Godie was a self-styled French Impressionist with the belief in her work as being as significant as Paul Cézanne. She was particular about who she sold her art to and even to whom she talked to. Her fashion style was just as unique as her personality, and she could be seen wearing different swatches of fabric wrapped around herself or fur coats that were pieced together.
Lee Godie remained in downtown Chicago for almost a 30-year period, becoming a facet to the social milieu during that time. Eventually Godie was reunited with her daughter Bonnie Blank, who moved her out to the suburbs to live with her. On August 28, 1991, Chicago’s Mayor Daley proclaimed September “Lee Godie Exhibition Month”. Between March 13, 1993 and January 16, 2004, an exhibition entitled “Artist Lee Godie: A Twenty-Year Retrospective”, curated by Michael Bonesteel, who wrote the “Lee Godie” article in Raw Vision magazine, was presented at the Chicago Cultural Center. From September 12, 2008 to January 3, 2009, an exhibition of over 100 pieces of Lee Godie’s work entitled “Finding Beauty: The Art of Lee Godie” was on exhibit at Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art. Her work can be found in the permanent collections of the Museum of American Folk Art in New York City, the Milwaukee Art Museum, the Arkansas Arts Center and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago.
—from the Wikipedia entry on Lee Godie Lee Godie (1908–1994) was an American self-taught artist who lived most of her life in Chicago. Lee Godie was born Jamot Emily Godie. She later married and had three children, but following the death of two of her children and the failure of her marriage she found herself living on the streets of Chicago. Godie could be seen on the steps of the Art Institute of Chicago arriving on the scene in 1968 selling her canvases to passerby. She worked in a variety of mediums which included watercolor, pencil, tempera, ballpoint pen, and crayon and on a number of surfaces such as canvas, poster board, sheets of paper and discarded window blinds. Some of her works were several pieces stitched together in the fashion of a triptych or book. Also included in the array of art works Godie created are the black-and-white snapshots from photo booths she took of herself dressed up in different personae. She would take these photos and embellish certain parts of them, adding color to her lips or nails or painting on darker eyebrows.
Godie was a self-styled French Impressionist with the belief in her work as being as significant as Paul Cézanne. She was particular about who she sold her art to and even to whom she talked to. Her fashion style was just as unique as her personality, and she could be seen wearing different swatches of fabric wrapped around herself or fur coats that were pieced together.
Lee Godie remained in downtown Chicago for almost a 30-year period, becoming a facet to the social milieu during that time. Eventually Godie was reunited with her daughter Bonnie Blank, who moved her out to the suburbs to live with her. On August 28, 1991, Chicago’s Mayor Daley proclaimed September “Lee Godie Exhibition Month”. Between March 13, 1993 and January 16, 2004, an exhibition entitled “Artist Lee Godie: A Twenty-Year Retrospective”, curated by Michael Bonesteel, who wrote the “Lee Godie” article in Raw Vision magazine, was presented at the Chicago Cultural Center. From September 12, 2008 to January 3, 2009, an exhibition of over 100 pieces of Lee Godie’s work entitled “Finding Beauty: The Art of Lee Godie” was on exhibit at Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art. Her work can be found in the permanent collections of the Museum of American Folk Art in New York City, the Milwaukee Art Museum, the Arkansas Arts Center and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago.
—from the Wikipedia entry on Lee Godie Lee Godie (1908–1994) was an American self-taught artist who lived most of her life in Chicago. Lee Godie was born Jamot Emily Godie. She later married and had three children, but following the death of two of her children and the failure of her marriage she found herself living on the streets of Chicago. Godie could be seen on the steps of the Art Institute of Chicago arriving on the scene in 1968 selling her canvases to passerby. She worked in a variety of mediums which included watercolor, pencil, tempera, ballpoint pen, and crayon and on a number of surfaces such as canvas, poster board, sheets of paper and discarded window blinds. Some of her works were several pieces stitched together in the fashion of a triptych or book. Also included in the array of art works Godie created are the black-and-white snapshots from photo booths she took of herself dressed up in different personae. She would take these photos and embellish certain parts of them, adding color to her lips or nails or painting on darker eyebrows.
Godie was a self-styled French Impressionist with the belief in her work as being as significant as Paul Cézanne. She was particular about who she sold her art to and even to whom she talked to. Her fashion style was just as unique as her personality, and she could be seen wearing different swatches of fabric wrapped around herself or fur coats that were pieced together.
Lee Godie remained in downtown Chicago for almost a 30-year period, becoming a facet to the social milieu during that time. Eventually Godie was reunited with her daughter Bonnie Blank, who moved her out to the suburbs to live with her. On August 28, 1991, Chicago’s Mayor Daley proclaimed September “Lee Godie Exhibition Month”. Between March 13, 1993 and January 16, 2004, an exhibition entitled “Artist Lee Godie: A Twenty-Year Retrospective”, curated by Michael Bonesteel, who wrote the “Lee Godie” article in Raw Vision magazine, was presented at the Chicago Cultural Center. From September 12, 2008 to January 3, 2009, an exhibition of over 100 pieces of Lee Godie’s work entitled “Finding Beauty: The Art of Lee Godie” was on exhibit at Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art. Her work can be found in the permanent collections of the Museum of American Folk Art in New York City, the Milwaukee Art Museum, the Arkansas Arts Center and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago.
—from the Wikipedia entry on Lee Godie Lee Godie (1908–1994) was an American self-taught artist who lived most of her life in Chicago. Lee Godie was born Jamot Emily Godie. She later married and had three children, but following the death of two of her children and the failure of her marriage she found herself living on the streets of Chicago. Godie could be seen on the steps of the Art Institute of Chicago arriving on the scene in 1968 selling her canvases to passerby. She worked in a variety of mediums which included watercolor, pencil, tempera, ballpoint pen, and crayon and on a number of surfaces such as canvas, poster board, sheets of paper and discarded window blinds. Some of her works were several pieces stitched together in the fashion of a triptych or book. Also included in the array of art works Godie created are the black-and-white snapshots from photo booths she took of herself dressed up in different personae. She would take these photos and embellish certain parts of them, adding color to her lips or nails or painting on darker eyebrows.
Godie was a self-styled French Impressionist with the belief in her work as being as significant as Paul Cézanne. She was particular about who she sold her art to and even to whom she talked to. Her fashion style was just as unique as her personality, and she could be seen wearing different swatches of fabric wrapped around herself or fur coats that were pieced together.
Lee Godie remained in downtown Chicago for almost a 30-year period, becoming a facet to the social milieu during that time. Eventually Godie was reunited with her daughter Bonnie Blank, who moved her out to the suburbs to live with her. On August 28, 1991, Chicago’s Mayor Daley proclaimed September “Lee Godie Exhibition Month”. Between March 13, 1993 and January 16, 2004, an exhibition entitled “Artist Lee Godie: A Twenty-Year Retrospective”, curated by Michael Bonesteel, who wrote the “Lee Godie” article in Raw Vision magazine, was presented at the Chicago Cultural Center. From September 12, 2008 to January 3, 2009, an exhibition of over 100 pieces of Lee Godie’s work entitled “Finding Beauty: The Art of Lee Godie” was on exhibit at Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art. Her work can be found in the permanent collections of the Museum of American Folk Art in New York City, the Milwaukee Art Museum, the Arkansas Arts Center and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago.
—from the Wikipedia entry on Lee Godie Lee Godie (1908–1994) was an American self-taught artist who lived most of her life in Chicago. Lee Godie was born Jamot Emily Godie. She later married and had three children, but following the death of two of her children and the failure of her marriage she found herself living on the streets of Chicago. Godie could be seen on the steps of the Art Institute of Chicago arriving on the scene in 1968 selling her canvases to passerby. She worked in a variety of mediums which included watercolor, pencil, tempera, ballpoint pen, and crayon and on a number of surfaces such as canvas, poster board, sheets of paper and discarded window blinds. Some of her works were several pieces stitched together in the fashion of a triptych or book. Also included in the array of art works Godie created are the black-and-white snapshots from photo booths she took of herself dressed up in different personae. She would take these photos and embellish certain parts of them, adding color to her lips or nails or painting on darker eyebrows.
Godie was a self-styled French Impressionist with the belief in her work as being as significant as Paul Cézanne. She was particular about who she sold her art to and even to whom she talked to. Her fashion style was just as unique as her personality, and she could be seen wearing different swatches of fabric wrapped around herself or fur coats that were pieced together.
Lee Godie remained in downtown Chicago for almost a 30-year period, becoming a facet to the social milieu during that time. Eventually Godie was reunited with her daughter Bonnie Blank, who moved her out to the suburbs to live with her. On August 28, 1991, Chicago’s Mayor Daley proclaimed September “Lee Godie Exhibition Month”. Between March 13, 1993 and January 16, 2004, an exhibition entitled “Artist Lee Godie: A Twenty-Year Retrospective”, curated by Michael Bonesteel, who wrote the “Lee Godie” article in Raw Vision magazine, was presented at the Chicago Cultural Center. From September 12, 2008 to January 3, 2009, an exhibition of over 100 pieces of Lee Godie’s work entitled “Finding Beauty: The Art of Lee Godie” was on exhibit at Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art. Her work can be found in the permanent collections of the Museum of American Folk Art in New York City, the Milwaukee Art Museum, the Arkansas Arts Center and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago.
—from the Wikipedia entry on Lee Godie

Lee Godie (1908–1994) was an American self-taught artist who lived most of her life in Chicago. Lee Godie was born Jamot Emily Godie. She later married and had three children, but following the death of two of her children and the failure of her marriage she found herself living on the streets of Chicago. Godie could be seen on the steps of the Art Institute of Chicago arriving on the scene in 1968 selling her canvases to passerby. She worked in a variety of mediums which included watercolor, pencil, tempera, ballpoint pen, and crayon and on a number of surfaces such as canvas, poster board, sheets of paper and discarded window blinds. Some of her works were several pieces stitched together in the fashion of a triptych or book. Also included in the array of art works Godie created are the black-and-white snapshots from photo booths she took of herself dressed up in different personae. She would take these photos and embellish certain parts of them, adding color to her lips or nails or painting on darker eyebrows.

Godie was a self-styled French Impressionist with the belief in her work as being as significant as Paul Cézanne. She was particular about who she sold her art to and even to whom she talked to. Her fashion style was just as unique as her personality, and she could be seen wearing different swatches of fabric wrapped around herself or fur coats that were pieced together.

Lee Godie remained in downtown Chicago for almost a 30-year period, becoming a facet to the social milieu during that time. Eventually Godie was reunited with her daughter Bonnie Blank, who moved her out to the suburbs to live with her. On August 28, 1991, Chicago’s Mayor Daley proclaimed September “Lee Godie Exhibition Month”. Between March 13, 1993 and January 16, 2004, an exhibition entitled “Artist Lee Godie: A Twenty-Year Retrospective”, curated by Michael Bonesteel, who wrote the “Lee Godie” article in Raw Vision magazine, was presented at the Chicago Cultural Center. From September 12, 2008 to January 3, 2009, an exhibition of over 100 pieces of Lee Godie’s work entitled “Finding Beauty: The Art of Lee Godie” was on exhibit at Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art. Her work can be found in the permanent collections of the Museum of American Folk Art in New York City, the Milwaukee Art Museum, the Arkansas Arts Center and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago.

—from the Wikipedia entry on Lee Godie