abstracthinker:

Behind the Scenes in Blue   27.5 x 17.5  Acrylic with knife on 300lb Cold Press

Original Artwork by: Patricia Oblack

http://patriciaoblack.com    http://www.blurb.com/b/196889-patricia-oblack

Patricia Oblack uses her emotions and palette knife to guide her when creating a work of art. She views her abstract works as open to interpretation by different viewers. Her work is greatly influenced by the palette knife”s relationship with the surface, and by music. She currently lives in Missouri and was heavily influenced by the work of Marcia Myers.

Artists on tumblr

(via curiositiesandspeculations)

materialworld:

Known for taking inspiration in architecture and monumental constructions, Irina Dzhus is a designer who uses these things and integrates them in such a way that looks feminine. Experimenting with boyish silhouettes and turning them around, she uses geometry and origami to compile a garment which is futuristic and simple. (via FASHION156 / Daily Blog)

Women’s Outsider Art, Part IX:
Minnie Evans
Evans was born in 1892 in South Carolina. She attended school through the sixth grade, dropping out in 1903 because of the family’s economic hardship, finding a job as selling shellfish door to door. In 1908 she quit to marry, and worked as a full-time mother for eight years before becoming a paid domestic worker. Following a dream revelation, Evans began to draw and paint at the age of 43, creating her first pieces of artwork on a scrap of paper bag. Five years later she decided to really dedicate herself to recording her dreams through art. She painted her early works on US Coast guard stationery and later worked with more precision, using ink, graphite, wax crayon, watercolour and oil on canvas, board and paper. She died in 1987, and is now recognized as one of the most important visionary folk artist of the 20th century.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IX:
Minnie Evans
Evans was born in 1892 in South Carolina. She attended school through the sixth grade, dropping out in 1903 because of the family’s economic hardship, finding a job as selling shellfish door to door. In 1908 she quit to marry, and worked as a full-time mother for eight years before becoming a paid domestic worker. Following a dream revelation, Evans began to draw and paint at the age of 43, creating her first pieces of artwork on a scrap of paper bag. Five years later she decided to really dedicate herself to recording her dreams through art. She painted her early works on US Coast guard stationery and later worked with more precision, using ink, graphite, wax crayon, watercolour and oil on canvas, board and paper. She died in 1987, and is now recognized as one of the most important visionary folk artist of the 20th century.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IX:
Minnie Evans
Evans was born in 1892 in South Carolina. She attended school through the sixth grade, dropping out in 1903 because of the family’s economic hardship, finding a job as selling shellfish door to door. In 1908 she quit to marry, and worked as a full-time mother for eight years before becoming a paid domestic worker. Following a dream revelation, Evans began to draw and paint at the age of 43, creating her first pieces of artwork on a scrap of paper bag. Five years later she decided to really dedicate herself to recording her dreams through art. She painted her early works on US Coast guard stationery and later worked with more precision, using ink, graphite, wax crayon, watercolour and oil on canvas, board and paper. She died in 1987, and is now recognized as one of the most important visionary folk artist of the 20th century.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IX:
Minnie Evans
Evans was born in 1892 in South Carolina. She attended school through the sixth grade, dropping out in 1903 because of the family’s economic hardship, finding a job as selling shellfish door to door. In 1908 she quit to marry, and worked as a full-time mother for eight years before becoming a paid domestic worker. Following a dream revelation, Evans began to draw and paint at the age of 43, creating her first pieces of artwork on a scrap of paper bag. Five years later she decided to really dedicate herself to recording her dreams through art. She painted her early works on US Coast guard stationery and later worked with more precision, using ink, graphite, wax crayon, watercolour and oil on canvas, board and paper. She died in 1987, and is now recognized as one of the most important visionary folk artist of the 20th century.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IX:
Minnie Evans
Evans was born in 1892 in South Carolina. She attended school through the sixth grade, dropping out in 1903 because of the family’s economic hardship, finding a job as selling shellfish door to door. In 1908 she quit to marry, and worked as a full-time mother for eight years before becoming a paid domestic worker. Following a dream revelation, Evans began to draw and paint at the age of 43, creating her first pieces of artwork on a scrap of paper bag. Five years later she decided to really dedicate herself to recording her dreams through art. She painted her early works on US Coast guard stationery and later worked with more precision, using ink, graphite, wax crayon, watercolour and oil on canvas, board and paper. She died in 1987, and is now recognized as one of the most important visionary folk artist of the 20th century.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IX:
Minnie Evans
Evans was born in 1892 in South Carolina. She attended school through the sixth grade, dropping out in 1903 because of the family’s economic hardship, finding a job as selling shellfish door to door. In 1908 she quit to marry, and worked as a full-time mother for eight years before becoming a paid domestic worker. Following a dream revelation, Evans began to draw and paint at the age of 43, creating her first pieces of artwork on a scrap of paper bag. Five years later she decided to really dedicate herself to recording her dreams through art. She painted her early works on US Coast guard stationery and later worked with more precision, using ink, graphite, wax crayon, watercolour and oil on canvas, board and paper. She died in 1987, and is now recognized as one of the most important visionary folk artist of the 20th century.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IX:
Minnie Evans
Evans was born in 1892 in South Carolina. She attended school through the sixth grade, dropping out in 1903 because of the family’s economic hardship, finding a job as selling shellfish door to door. In 1908 she quit to marry, and worked as a full-time mother for eight years before becoming a paid domestic worker. Following a dream revelation, Evans began to draw and paint at the age of 43, creating her first pieces of artwork on a scrap of paper bag. Five years later she decided to really dedicate herself to recording her dreams through art. She painted her early works on US Coast guard stationery and later worked with more precision, using ink, graphite, wax crayon, watercolour and oil on canvas, board and paper. She died in 1987, and is now recognized as one of the most important visionary folk artist of the 20th century.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IX:
Minnie Evans
Evans was born in 1892 in South Carolina. She attended school through the sixth grade, dropping out in 1903 because of the family’s economic hardship, finding a job as selling shellfish door to door. In 1908 she quit to marry, and worked as a full-time mother for eight years before becoming a paid domestic worker. Following a dream revelation, Evans began to draw and paint at the age of 43, creating her first pieces of artwork on a scrap of paper bag. Five years later she decided to really dedicate herself to recording her dreams through art. She painted her early works on US Coast guard stationery and later worked with more precision, using ink, graphite, wax crayon, watercolour and oil on canvas, board and paper. She died in 1987, and is now recognized as one of the most important visionary folk artist of the 20th century.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IX:
Minnie Evans
Evans was born in 1892 in South Carolina. She attended school through the sixth grade, dropping out in 1903 because of the family’s economic hardship, finding a job as selling shellfish door to door. In 1908 she quit to marry, and worked as a full-time mother for eight years before becoming a paid domestic worker. Following a dream revelation, Evans began to draw and paint at the age of 43, creating her first pieces of artwork on a scrap of paper bag. Five years later she decided to really dedicate herself to recording her dreams through art. She painted her early works on US Coast guard stationery and later worked with more precision, using ink, graphite, wax crayon, watercolour and oil on canvas, board and paper. She died in 1987, and is now recognized as one of the most important visionary folk artist of the 20th century.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IX:
Minnie Evans
Evans was born in 1892 in South Carolina. She attended school through the sixth grade, dropping out in 1903 because of the family’s economic hardship, finding a job as selling shellfish door to door. In 1908 she quit to marry, and worked as a full-time mother for eight years before becoming a paid domestic worker. Following a dream revelation, Evans began to draw and paint at the age of 43, creating her first pieces of artwork on a scrap of paper bag. Five years later she decided to really dedicate herself to recording her dreams through art. She painted her early works on US Coast guard stationery and later worked with more precision, using ink, graphite, wax crayon, watercolour and oil on canvas, board and paper. She died in 1987, and is now recognized as one of the most important visionary folk artist of the 20th century.
—from Wikipedia

Women’s Outsider Art, Part IX:

Minnie Evans

Evans was born in 1892 in South Carolina. She attended school through the sixth grade, dropping out in 1903 because of the family’s economic hardship, finding a job as selling shellfish door to door. In 1908 she quit to marry, and worked as a full-time mother for eight years before becoming a paid domestic worker. Following a dream revelation, Evans began to draw and paint at the age of 43, creating her first pieces of artwork on a scrap of paper bag. Five years later she decided to really dedicate herself to recording her dreams through art. She painted her early works on US Coast guard stationery and later worked with more precision, using ink, graphite, wax crayon, watercolour and oil on canvas, board and paper. She died in 1987, and is now recognized as one of the most important visionary folk artist of the 20th century.

—from Wikipedia

Women’s Outsider Art, Part VIII:
Bessie Harvey
Bessie Harvey (born on October 11, 1929, died August 12, 1994) was an American artist best known for her sculptures constructed out of found objects, primarily pieces of found wood. Harvey was the seventh of thirteen children born to Homer and Rosie Mae White. At the age of fourteen she married Charles Harvey, from whom she separated in her early twenties and relocated independently to Alcoa, Tennessee. In 1977 Harvey began working at Blount Memorial Hospital where she first began to exhibit her artwork. In 1995 Harvey was included in the Whitney Biennial at the Whitney Museum of American Art. 
— from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VIII:
Bessie Harvey
Bessie Harvey (born on October 11, 1929, died August 12, 1994) was an American artist best known for her sculptures constructed out of found objects, primarily pieces of found wood. Harvey was the seventh of thirteen children born to Homer and Rosie Mae White. At the age of fourteen she married Charles Harvey, from whom she separated in her early twenties and relocated independently to Alcoa, Tennessee. In 1977 Harvey began working at Blount Memorial Hospital where she first began to exhibit her artwork. In 1995 Harvey was included in the Whitney Biennial at the Whitney Museum of American Art. 
— from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VIII:
Bessie Harvey
Bessie Harvey (born on October 11, 1929, died August 12, 1994) was an American artist best known for her sculptures constructed out of found objects, primarily pieces of found wood. Harvey was the seventh of thirteen children born to Homer and Rosie Mae White. At the age of fourteen she married Charles Harvey, from whom she separated in her early twenties and relocated independently to Alcoa, Tennessee. In 1977 Harvey began working at Blount Memorial Hospital where she first began to exhibit her artwork. In 1995 Harvey was included in the Whitney Biennial at the Whitney Museum of American Art. 
— from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VIII:
Bessie Harvey
Bessie Harvey (born on October 11, 1929, died August 12, 1994) was an American artist best known for her sculptures constructed out of found objects, primarily pieces of found wood. Harvey was the seventh of thirteen children born to Homer and Rosie Mae White. At the age of fourteen she married Charles Harvey, from whom she separated in her early twenties and relocated independently to Alcoa, Tennessee. In 1977 Harvey began working at Blount Memorial Hospital where she first began to exhibit her artwork. In 1995 Harvey was included in the Whitney Biennial at the Whitney Museum of American Art. 
— from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VIII:
Bessie Harvey
Bessie Harvey (born on October 11, 1929, died August 12, 1994) was an American artist best known for her sculptures constructed out of found objects, primarily pieces of found wood. Harvey was the seventh of thirteen children born to Homer and Rosie Mae White. At the age of fourteen she married Charles Harvey, from whom she separated in her early twenties and relocated independently to Alcoa, Tennessee. In 1977 Harvey began working at Blount Memorial Hospital where she first began to exhibit her artwork. In 1995 Harvey was included in the Whitney Biennial at the Whitney Museum of American Art. 
— from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VIII:
Bessie Harvey
Bessie Harvey (born on October 11, 1929, died August 12, 1994) was an American artist best known for her sculptures constructed out of found objects, primarily pieces of found wood. Harvey was the seventh of thirteen children born to Homer and Rosie Mae White. At the age of fourteen she married Charles Harvey, from whom she separated in her early twenties and relocated independently to Alcoa, Tennessee. In 1977 Harvey began working at Blount Memorial Hospital where she first began to exhibit her artwork. In 1995 Harvey was included in the Whitney Biennial at the Whitney Museum of American Art. 
— from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VIII:
Bessie Harvey
Bessie Harvey (born on October 11, 1929, died August 12, 1994) was an American artist best known for her sculptures constructed out of found objects, primarily pieces of found wood. Harvey was the seventh of thirteen children born to Homer and Rosie Mae White. At the age of fourteen she married Charles Harvey, from whom she separated in her early twenties and relocated independently to Alcoa, Tennessee. In 1977 Harvey began working at Blount Memorial Hospital where she first began to exhibit her artwork. In 1995 Harvey was included in the Whitney Biennial at the Whitney Museum of American Art. 
— from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VIII:
Bessie Harvey
Bessie Harvey (born on October 11, 1929, died August 12, 1994) was an American artist best known for her sculptures constructed out of found objects, primarily pieces of found wood. Harvey was the seventh of thirteen children born to Homer and Rosie Mae White. At the age of fourteen she married Charles Harvey, from whom she separated in her early twenties and relocated independently to Alcoa, Tennessee. In 1977 Harvey began working at Blount Memorial Hospital where she first began to exhibit her artwork. In 1995 Harvey was included in the Whitney Biennial at the Whitney Museum of American Art. 
— from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VIII:
Bessie Harvey
Bessie Harvey (born on October 11, 1929, died August 12, 1994) was an American artist best known for her sculptures constructed out of found objects, primarily pieces of found wood. Harvey was the seventh of thirteen children born to Homer and Rosie Mae White. At the age of fourteen she married Charles Harvey, from whom she separated in her early twenties and relocated independently to Alcoa, Tennessee. In 1977 Harvey began working at Blount Memorial Hospital where she first began to exhibit her artwork. In 1995 Harvey was included in the Whitney Biennial at the Whitney Museum of American Art. 
— from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VIII:
Bessie Harvey
Bessie Harvey (born on October 11, 1929, died August 12, 1994) was an American artist best known for her sculptures constructed out of found objects, primarily pieces of found wood. Harvey was the seventh of thirteen children born to Homer and Rosie Mae White. At the age of fourteen she married Charles Harvey, from whom she separated in her early twenties and relocated independently to Alcoa, Tennessee. In 1977 Harvey began working at Blount Memorial Hospital where she first began to exhibit her artwork. In 1995 Harvey was included in the Whitney Biennial at the Whitney Museum of American Art. 
— from Wikipedia

Women’s Outsider Art, Part VIII:

Bessie Harvey

Bessie Harvey (born on October 11, 1929, died August 12, 1994) was an American artist best known for her sculptures constructed out of found objects, primarily pieces of found wood. Harvey was the seventh of thirteen children born to Homer and Rosie Mae White. At the age of fourteen she married Charles Harvey, from whom she separated in her early twenties and relocated independently to Alcoa, Tennessee. In 1977 Harvey began working at Blount Memorial Hospital where she first began to exhibit her artwork. In 1995 Harvey was included in the Whitney Biennial at the Whitney Museum of American Art.

— from Wikipedia

Women’s Outsider Art, Part VII:
Helen Martins
Born in South Africa in 1897, Martins was briefly married before returning to live with her parents, who left her their house after they died. Martins used cement, glass, and wire to decorate the interior of her home and later build sculptures in her garden, drawing inspiration from Christian biblical texts, the poetry of Omar Khayyam, and various works by William Blake. Martin’s longtime exposure to the fine crushed glass she used to decorate her walls and ceilings eventually caused her eyesight to start failing, leading her to commit suicide in 1976. Her house— known as the Owl House— has been kept intact as a museum.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VII:
Helen Martins
Born in South Africa in 1897, Martins was briefly married before returning to live with her parents, who left her their house after they died. Martins used cement, glass, and wire to decorate the interior of her home and later build sculptures in her garden, drawing inspiration from Christian biblical texts, the poetry of Omar Khayyam, and various works by William Blake. Martin’s longtime exposure to the fine crushed glass she used to decorate her walls and ceilings eventually caused her eyesight to start failing, leading her to commit suicide in 1976. Her house— known as the Owl House— has been kept intact as a museum.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VII:
Helen Martins
Born in South Africa in 1897, Martins was briefly married before returning to live with her parents, who left her their house after they died. Martins used cement, glass, and wire to decorate the interior of her home and later build sculptures in her garden, drawing inspiration from Christian biblical texts, the poetry of Omar Khayyam, and various works by William Blake. Martin’s longtime exposure to the fine crushed glass she used to decorate her walls and ceilings eventually caused her eyesight to start failing, leading her to commit suicide in 1976. Her house— known as the Owl House— has been kept intact as a museum.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VII:
Helen Martins
Born in South Africa in 1897, Martins was briefly married before returning to live with her parents, who left her their house after they died. Martins used cement, glass, and wire to decorate the interior of her home and later build sculptures in her garden, drawing inspiration from Christian biblical texts, the poetry of Omar Khayyam, and various works by William Blake. Martin’s longtime exposure to the fine crushed glass she used to decorate her walls and ceilings eventually caused her eyesight to start failing, leading her to commit suicide in 1976. Her house— known as the Owl House— has been kept intact as a museum.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VII:
Helen Martins
Born in South Africa in 1897, Martins was briefly married before returning to live with her parents, who left her their house after they died. Martins used cement, glass, and wire to decorate the interior of her home and later build sculptures in her garden, drawing inspiration from Christian biblical texts, the poetry of Omar Khayyam, and various works by William Blake. Martin’s longtime exposure to the fine crushed glass she used to decorate her walls and ceilings eventually caused her eyesight to start failing, leading her to commit suicide in 1976. Her house— known as the Owl House— has been kept intact as a museum.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VII:
Helen Martins
Born in South Africa in 1897, Martins was briefly married before returning to live with her parents, who left her their house after they died. Martins used cement, glass, and wire to decorate the interior of her home and later build sculptures in her garden, drawing inspiration from Christian biblical texts, the poetry of Omar Khayyam, and various works by William Blake. Martin’s longtime exposure to the fine crushed glass she used to decorate her walls and ceilings eventually caused her eyesight to start failing, leading her to commit suicide in 1976. Her house— known as the Owl House— has been kept intact as a museum.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VII:
Helen Martins
Born in South Africa in 1897, Martins was briefly married before returning to live with her parents, who left her their house after they died. Martins used cement, glass, and wire to decorate the interior of her home and later build sculptures in her garden, drawing inspiration from Christian biblical texts, the poetry of Omar Khayyam, and various works by William Blake. Martin’s longtime exposure to the fine crushed glass she used to decorate her walls and ceilings eventually caused her eyesight to start failing, leading her to commit suicide in 1976. Her house— known as the Owl House— has been kept intact as a museum.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VII:
Helen Martins
Born in South Africa in 1897, Martins was briefly married before returning to live with her parents, who left her their house after they died. Martins used cement, glass, and wire to decorate the interior of her home and later build sculptures in her garden, drawing inspiration from Christian biblical texts, the poetry of Omar Khayyam, and various works by William Blake. Martin’s longtime exposure to the fine crushed glass she used to decorate her walls and ceilings eventually caused her eyesight to start failing, leading her to commit suicide in 1976. Her house— known as the Owl House— has been kept intact as a museum.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VII:
Helen Martins
Born in South Africa in 1897, Martins was briefly married before returning to live with her parents, who left her their house after they died. Martins used cement, glass, and wire to decorate the interior of her home and later build sculptures in her garden, drawing inspiration from Christian biblical texts, the poetry of Omar Khayyam, and various works by William Blake. Martin’s longtime exposure to the fine crushed glass she used to decorate her walls and ceilings eventually caused her eyesight to start failing, leading her to commit suicide in 1976. Her house— known as the Owl House— has been kept intact as a museum.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part VII:
Helen Martins
Born in South Africa in 1897, Martins was briefly married before returning to live with her parents, who left her their house after they died. Martins used cement, glass, and wire to decorate the interior of her home and later build sculptures in her garden, drawing inspiration from Christian biblical texts, the poetry of Omar Khayyam, and various works by William Blake. Martin’s longtime exposure to the fine crushed glass she used to decorate her walls and ceilings eventually caused her eyesight to start failing, leading her to commit suicide in 1976. Her house— known as the Owl House— has been kept intact as a museum.
—from Wikipedia

Women’s Outsider Art, Part VII:

Helen Martins

Born in South Africa in 1897, Martins was briefly married before returning to live with her parents, who left her their house after they died. Martins used cement, glass, and wire to decorate the interior of her home and later build sculptures in her garden, drawing inspiration from Christian biblical texts, the poetry of Omar Khayyam, and various works by William Blake. Martin’s longtime exposure to the fine crushed glass she used to decorate her walls and ceilings eventually caused her eyesight to start failing, leading her to commit suicide in 1976. Her house— known as the Owl House— has been kept intact as a museum.

—from Wikipedia

Women’s Outsider Art, Part VI:
Inez Nathaniel Walker
Born in South Carolina in 1911, Inez Nathaniel Walker joined the African American migration to the North in the 1930s. She eventually settled in rural New York, where she worked in an apple processing plant. Like many other self-taught artists, Walker turned to artmaking after a traumatic experience: she began to draw in the late 1960s or early 1970s while in prison for the manslaughter of an abusive male friend. To escape the loneliness and monotony of prison life, Walker drew numerous portraits of fashionably dressed and meticulously groomed men and women. After her release in 1972, Walker further developed her distinctive style, which is characterized by bold draftsmanship and inventive patterning.—from the American Folk Art Museum Women’s Outsider Art, Part VI:
Inez Nathaniel Walker
Born in South Carolina in 1911, Inez Nathaniel Walker joined the African American migration to the North in the 1930s. She eventually settled in rural New York, where she worked in an apple processing plant. Like many other self-taught artists, Walker turned to artmaking after a traumatic experience: she began to draw in the late 1960s or early 1970s while in prison for the manslaughter of an abusive male friend. To escape the loneliness and monotony of prison life, Walker drew numerous portraits of fashionably dressed and meticulously groomed men and women. After her release in 1972, Walker further developed her distinctive style, which is characterized by bold draftsmanship and inventive patterning.—from the American Folk Art Museum Women’s Outsider Art, Part VI:
Inez Nathaniel Walker
Born in South Carolina in 1911, Inez Nathaniel Walker joined the African American migration to the North in the 1930s. She eventually settled in rural New York, where she worked in an apple processing plant. Like many other self-taught artists, Walker turned to artmaking after a traumatic experience: she began to draw in the late 1960s or early 1970s while in prison for the manslaughter of an abusive male friend. To escape the loneliness and monotony of prison life, Walker drew numerous portraits of fashionably dressed and meticulously groomed men and women. After her release in 1972, Walker further developed her distinctive style, which is characterized by bold draftsmanship and inventive patterning.—from the American Folk Art Museum Women’s Outsider Art, Part VI:
Inez Nathaniel Walker
Born in South Carolina in 1911, Inez Nathaniel Walker joined the African American migration to the North in the 1930s. She eventually settled in rural New York, where she worked in an apple processing plant. Like many other self-taught artists, Walker turned to artmaking after a traumatic experience: she began to draw in the late 1960s or early 1970s while in prison for the manslaughter of an abusive male friend. To escape the loneliness and monotony of prison life, Walker drew numerous portraits of fashionably dressed and meticulously groomed men and women. After her release in 1972, Walker further developed her distinctive style, which is characterized by bold draftsmanship and inventive patterning.—from the American Folk Art Museum Women’s Outsider Art, Part VI:
Inez Nathaniel Walker
Born in South Carolina in 1911, Inez Nathaniel Walker joined the African American migration to the North in the 1930s. She eventually settled in rural New York, where she worked in an apple processing plant. Like many other self-taught artists, Walker turned to artmaking after a traumatic experience: she began to draw in the late 1960s or early 1970s while in prison for the manslaughter of an abusive male friend. To escape the loneliness and monotony of prison life, Walker drew numerous portraits of fashionably dressed and meticulously groomed men and women. After her release in 1972, Walker further developed her distinctive style, which is characterized by bold draftsmanship and inventive patterning.—from the American Folk Art Museum Women’s Outsider Art, Part VI:
Inez Nathaniel Walker
Born in South Carolina in 1911, Inez Nathaniel Walker joined the African American migration to the North in the 1930s. She eventually settled in rural New York, where she worked in an apple processing plant. Like many other self-taught artists, Walker turned to artmaking after a traumatic experience: she began to draw in the late 1960s or early 1970s while in prison for the manslaughter of an abusive male friend. To escape the loneliness and monotony of prison life, Walker drew numerous portraits of fashionably dressed and meticulously groomed men and women. After her release in 1972, Walker further developed her distinctive style, which is characterized by bold draftsmanship and inventive patterning.—from the American Folk Art Museum Women’s Outsider Art, Part VI:
Inez Nathaniel Walker
Born in South Carolina in 1911, Inez Nathaniel Walker joined the African American migration to the North in the 1930s. She eventually settled in rural New York, where she worked in an apple processing plant. Like many other self-taught artists, Walker turned to artmaking after a traumatic experience: she began to draw in the late 1960s or early 1970s while in prison for the manslaughter of an abusive male friend. To escape the loneliness and monotony of prison life, Walker drew numerous portraits of fashionably dressed and meticulously groomed men and women. After her release in 1972, Walker further developed her distinctive style, which is characterized by bold draftsmanship and inventive patterning.—from the American Folk Art Museum Women’s Outsider Art, Part VI:
Inez Nathaniel Walker
Born in South Carolina in 1911, Inez Nathaniel Walker joined the African American migration to the North in the 1930s. She eventually settled in rural New York, where she worked in an apple processing plant. Like many other self-taught artists, Walker turned to artmaking after a traumatic experience: she began to draw in the late 1960s or early 1970s while in prison for the manslaughter of an abusive male friend. To escape the loneliness and monotony of prison life, Walker drew numerous portraits of fashionably dressed and meticulously groomed men and women. After her release in 1972, Walker further developed her distinctive style, which is characterized by bold draftsmanship and inventive patterning.—from the American Folk Art Museum Women’s Outsider Art, Part VI:
Inez Nathaniel Walker
Born in South Carolina in 1911, Inez Nathaniel Walker joined the African American migration to the North in the 1930s. She eventually settled in rural New York, where she worked in an apple processing plant. Like many other self-taught artists, Walker turned to artmaking after a traumatic experience: she began to draw in the late 1960s or early 1970s while in prison for the manslaughter of an abusive male friend. To escape the loneliness and monotony of prison life, Walker drew numerous portraits of fashionably dressed and meticulously groomed men and women. After her release in 1972, Walker further developed her distinctive style, which is characterized by bold draftsmanship and inventive patterning.—from the American Folk Art Museum Women’s Outsider Art, Part VI:
Inez Nathaniel Walker
Born in South Carolina in 1911, Inez Nathaniel Walker joined the African American migration to the North in the 1930s. She eventually settled in rural New York, where she worked in an apple processing plant. Like many other self-taught artists, Walker turned to artmaking after a traumatic experience: she began to draw in the late 1960s or early 1970s while in prison for the manslaughter of an abusive male friend. To escape the loneliness and monotony of prison life, Walker drew numerous portraits of fashionably dressed and meticulously groomed men and women. After her release in 1972, Walker further developed her distinctive style, which is characterized by bold draftsmanship and inventive patterning.—from the American Folk Art Museum

Women’s Outsider Art, Part VI:

Inez Nathaniel Walker

Born in South Carolina in 1911, Inez Nathaniel Walker joined the African American migration to the North in the 1930s. She eventually settled in rural New York, where she worked in an apple processing plant. Like many other self-taught artists, Walker turned to artmaking after a traumatic experience: she began to draw in the late 1960s or early 1970s while in prison for the manslaughter of an abusive male friend. To escape the loneliness and monotony of prison life, Walker drew numerous portraits of fashionably dressed and meticulously groomed men and women. After her release in 1972, Walker further developed her distinctive style, which is characterized by bold draftsmanship and inventive patterning.

—from the American Folk Art Museum

Women’s Outsider Art, Part V:
Nellie Mae Rowe
Rowe was born in 1900 in Georgia. Burdened by financial pressures, she left school after the fourth grade to work in the fields with her father, Sam Williams.  While Rowe displayed an early interest in drawing and fashioning dolls out of left over cloth, it wasn’t until the death of her second husband that her artistic talents came to fruition. Rowe’s living space – her home and yard – served as her first canvas and installation project. There, recycled and discarded materials became works of art. Scraps of wood and chewing gum became dolls and sculptures. Soon she turned to drawing and painting.During final years of her life, Rowe’s artistic career culminated in nationwide attention and considerable financial success.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part V:
Nellie Mae Rowe
Rowe was born in 1900 in Georgia. Burdened by financial pressures, she left school after the fourth grade to work in the fields with her father, Sam Williams.  While Rowe displayed an early interest in drawing and fashioning dolls out of left over cloth, it wasn’t until the death of her second husband that her artistic talents came to fruition. Rowe’s living space – her home and yard – served as her first canvas and installation project. There, recycled and discarded materials became works of art. Scraps of wood and chewing gum became dolls and sculptures. Soon she turned to drawing and painting.During final years of her life, Rowe’s artistic career culminated in nationwide attention and considerable financial success.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part V:
Nellie Mae Rowe
Rowe was born in 1900 in Georgia. Burdened by financial pressures, she left school after the fourth grade to work in the fields with her father, Sam Williams.  While Rowe displayed an early interest in drawing and fashioning dolls out of left over cloth, it wasn’t until the death of her second husband that her artistic talents came to fruition. Rowe’s living space – her home and yard – served as her first canvas and installation project. There, recycled and discarded materials became works of art. Scraps of wood and chewing gum became dolls and sculptures. Soon she turned to drawing and painting.During final years of her life, Rowe’s artistic career culminated in nationwide attention and considerable financial success.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part V:
Nellie Mae Rowe
Rowe was born in 1900 in Georgia. Burdened by financial pressures, she left school after the fourth grade to work in the fields with her father, Sam Williams.  While Rowe displayed an early interest in drawing and fashioning dolls out of left over cloth, it wasn’t until the death of her second husband that her artistic talents came to fruition. Rowe’s living space – her home and yard – served as her first canvas and installation project. There, recycled and discarded materials became works of art. Scraps of wood and chewing gum became dolls and sculptures. Soon she turned to drawing and painting.During final years of her life, Rowe’s artistic career culminated in nationwide attention and considerable financial success.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part V:
Nellie Mae Rowe
Rowe was born in 1900 in Georgia. Burdened by financial pressures, she left school after the fourth grade to work in the fields with her father, Sam Williams.  While Rowe displayed an early interest in drawing and fashioning dolls out of left over cloth, it wasn’t until the death of her second husband that her artistic talents came to fruition. Rowe’s living space – her home and yard – served as her first canvas and installation project. There, recycled and discarded materials became works of art. Scraps of wood and chewing gum became dolls and sculptures. Soon she turned to drawing and painting.During final years of her life, Rowe’s artistic career culminated in nationwide attention and considerable financial success.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part V:
Nellie Mae Rowe
Rowe was born in 1900 in Georgia. Burdened by financial pressures, she left school after the fourth grade to work in the fields with her father, Sam Williams.  While Rowe displayed an early interest in drawing and fashioning dolls out of left over cloth, it wasn’t until the death of her second husband that her artistic talents came to fruition. Rowe’s living space – her home and yard – served as her first canvas and installation project. There, recycled and discarded materials became works of art. Scraps of wood and chewing gum became dolls and sculptures. Soon she turned to drawing and painting.During final years of her life, Rowe’s artistic career culminated in nationwide attention and considerable financial success.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part V:
Nellie Mae Rowe
Rowe was born in 1900 in Georgia. Burdened by financial pressures, she left school after the fourth grade to work in the fields with her father, Sam Williams.  While Rowe displayed an early interest in drawing and fashioning dolls out of left over cloth, it wasn’t until the death of her second husband that her artistic talents came to fruition. Rowe’s living space – her home and yard – served as her first canvas and installation project. There, recycled and discarded materials became works of art. Scraps of wood and chewing gum became dolls and sculptures. Soon she turned to drawing and painting.During final years of her life, Rowe’s artistic career culminated in nationwide attention and considerable financial success.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part V:
Nellie Mae Rowe
Rowe was born in 1900 in Georgia. Burdened by financial pressures, she left school after the fourth grade to work in the fields with her father, Sam Williams.  While Rowe displayed an early interest in drawing and fashioning dolls out of left over cloth, it wasn’t until the death of her second husband that her artistic talents came to fruition. Rowe’s living space – her home and yard – served as her first canvas and installation project. There, recycled and discarded materials became works of art. Scraps of wood and chewing gum became dolls and sculptures. Soon she turned to drawing and painting.During final years of her life, Rowe’s artistic career culminated in nationwide attention and considerable financial success.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part V:
Nellie Mae Rowe
Rowe was born in 1900 in Georgia. Burdened by financial pressures, she left school after the fourth grade to work in the fields with her father, Sam Williams.  While Rowe displayed an early interest in drawing and fashioning dolls out of left over cloth, it wasn’t until the death of her second husband that her artistic talents came to fruition. Rowe’s living space – her home and yard – served as her first canvas and installation project. There, recycled and discarded materials became works of art. Scraps of wood and chewing gum became dolls and sculptures. Soon she turned to drawing and painting.During final years of her life, Rowe’s artistic career culminated in nationwide attention and considerable financial success.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part V:
Nellie Mae Rowe
Rowe was born in 1900 in Georgia. Burdened by financial pressures, she left school after the fourth grade to work in the fields with her father, Sam Williams.  While Rowe displayed an early interest in drawing and fashioning dolls out of left over cloth, it wasn’t until the death of her second husband that her artistic talents came to fruition. Rowe’s living space – her home and yard – served as her first canvas and installation project. There, recycled and discarded materials became works of art. Scraps of wood and chewing gum became dolls and sculptures. Soon she turned to drawing and painting.During final years of her life, Rowe’s artistic career culminated in nationwide attention and considerable financial success.
—from Wikipedia

Women’s Outsider Art, Part V:

Nellie Mae Rowe

Rowe was born in 1900 in Georgia. Burdened by financial pressures, she left school after the fourth grade to work in the fields with her father, Sam Williams. While Rowe displayed an early interest in drawing and fashioning dolls out of left over cloth, it wasn’t until the death of her second husband that her artistic talents came to fruition. Rowe’s living space – her home and yard – served as her first canvas and installation project. There, recycled and discarded materials became works of art. Scraps of wood and chewing gum became dolls and sculptures. Soon she turned to drawing and painting.During final years of her life, Rowe’s artistic career culminated in nationwide attention and considerable financial success.

—from Wikipedia

Women’s Outsider Art, Part IV:
Judith Scott
Judith Scott was born in Ohio in 1943. She was born profoundly deaf, mute, and with down syndrome. On medical advice, her parents placed her in an institution for the mentally retarded. In 1985, her twin sister became her legal guardian. After working at the Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, California, she became an internationally renowned fiber artist. She died at the age of 51.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IV:
Judith Scott
Judith Scott was born in Ohio in 1943. She was born profoundly deaf, mute, and with down syndrome. On medical advice, her parents placed her in an institution for the mentally retarded. In 1985, her twin sister became her legal guardian. After working at the Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, California, she became an internationally renowned fiber artist. She died at the age of 51.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IV:
Judith Scott
Judith Scott was born in Ohio in 1943. She was born profoundly deaf, mute, and with down syndrome. On medical advice, her parents placed her in an institution for the mentally retarded. In 1985, her twin sister became her legal guardian. After working at the Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, California, she became an internationally renowned fiber artist. She died at the age of 51.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IV:
Judith Scott
Judith Scott was born in Ohio in 1943. She was born profoundly deaf, mute, and with down syndrome. On medical advice, her parents placed her in an institution for the mentally retarded. In 1985, her twin sister became her legal guardian. After working at the Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, California, she became an internationally renowned fiber artist. She died at the age of 51.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IV:
Judith Scott
Judith Scott was born in Ohio in 1943. She was born profoundly deaf, mute, and with down syndrome. On medical advice, her parents placed her in an institution for the mentally retarded. In 1985, her twin sister became her legal guardian. After working at the Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, California, she became an internationally renowned fiber artist. She died at the age of 51.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IV:
Judith Scott
Judith Scott was born in Ohio in 1943. She was born profoundly deaf, mute, and with down syndrome. On medical advice, her parents placed her in an institution for the mentally retarded. In 1985, her twin sister became her legal guardian. After working at the Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, California, she became an internationally renowned fiber artist. She died at the age of 51.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IV:
Judith Scott
Judith Scott was born in Ohio in 1943. She was born profoundly deaf, mute, and with down syndrome. On medical advice, her parents placed her in an institution for the mentally retarded. In 1985, her twin sister became her legal guardian. After working at the Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, California, she became an internationally renowned fiber artist. She died at the age of 51.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IV:
Judith Scott
Judith Scott was born in Ohio in 1943. She was born profoundly deaf, mute, and with down syndrome. On medical advice, her parents placed her in an institution for the mentally retarded. In 1985, her twin sister became her legal guardian. After working at the Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, California, she became an internationally renowned fiber artist. She died at the age of 51.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IV:
Judith Scott
Judith Scott was born in Ohio in 1943. She was born profoundly deaf, mute, and with down syndrome. On medical advice, her parents placed her in an institution for the mentally retarded. In 1985, her twin sister became her legal guardian. After working at the Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, California, she became an internationally renowned fiber artist. She died at the age of 51.
—from Wikipedia Women’s Outsider Art, Part IV:
Judith Scott
Judith Scott was born in Ohio in 1943. She was born profoundly deaf, mute, and with down syndrome. On medical advice, her parents placed her in an institution for the mentally retarded. In 1985, her twin sister became her legal guardian. After working at the Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, California, she became an internationally renowned fiber artist. She died at the age of 51.
—from Wikipedia

Women’s Outsider Art, Part IV:

Judith Scott

Judith Scott was born in Ohio in 1943. She was born profoundly deaf, mute, and with down syndrome. On medical advice, her parents placed her in an institution for the mentally retarded. In 1985, her twin sister became her legal guardian. After working at the Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, California, she became an internationally renowned fiber artist. She died at the age of 51.

—from Wikipedia

Women’s Outsider Art, Part III:
Eileen Doman
Except for coloring hair and painting fingernails at a Genoa, Illinois beauty salon where she had been employed, Eileen Doman had never shown much of a predeliction for art. In the early 1990s, though, when she was nearing 40, she decided to try painting. Her life was to be quickly and radically transformed. By 1992, after her work was given exposure at the New York Outsider Art Fair, she was hailed as a major discovery. The people of Eileen Doman’s paintings are relatives and family friends, stopped in time, forty, fifty and more years ago. Most of the paintings spring from old family photographs. 
—from Dean Jensen Gallery Women’s Outsider Art, Part III:
Eileen Doman
Except for coloring hair and painting fingernails at a Genoa, Illinois beauty salon where she had been employed, Eileen Doman had never shown much of a predeliction for art. In the early 1990s, though, when she was nearing 40, she decided to try painting. Her life was to be quickly and radically transformed. By 1992, after her work was given exposure at the New York Outsider Art Fair, she was hailed as a major discovery. The people of Eileen Doman’s paintings are relatives and family friends, stopped in time, forty, fifty and more years ago. Most of the paintings spring from old family photographs. 
—from Dean Jensen Gallery Women’s Outsider Art, Part III:
Eileen Doman
Except for coloring hair and painting fingernails at a Genoa, Illinois beauty salon where she had been employed, Eileen Doman had never shown much of a predeliction for art. In the early 1990s, though, when she was nearing 40, she decided to try painting. Her life was to be quickly and radically transformed. By 1992, after her work was given exposure at the New York Outsider Art Fair, she was hailed as a major discovery. The people of Eileen Doman’s paintings are relatives and family friends, stopped in time, forty, fifty and more years ago. Most of the paintings spring from old family photographs. 
—from Dean Jensen Gallery Women’s Outsider Art, Part III:
Eileen Doman
Except for coloring hair and painting fingernails at a Genoa, Illinois beauty salon where she had been employed, Eileen Doman had never shown much of a predeliction for art. In the early 1990s, though, when she was nearing 40, she decided to try painting. Her life was to be quickly and radically transformed. By 1992, after her work was given exposure at the New York Outsider Art Fair, she was hailed as a major discovery. The people of Eileen Doman’s paintings are relatives and family friends, stopped in time, forty, fifty and more years ago. Most of the paintings spring from old family photographs. 
—from Dean Jensen Gallery Women’s Outsider Art, Part III:
Eileen Doman
Except for coloring hair and painting fingernails at a Genoa, Illinois beauty salon where she had been employed, Eileen Doman had never shown much of a predeliction for art. In the early 1990s, though, when she was nearing 40, she decided to try painting. Her life was to be quickly and radically transformed. By 1992, after her work was given exposure at the New York Outsider Art Fair, she was hailed as a major discovery. The people of Eileen Doman’s paintings are relatives and family friends, stopped in time, forty, fifty and more years ago. Most of the paintings spring from old family photographs. 
—from Dean Jensen Gallery Women’s Outsider Art, Part III:
Eileen Doman
Except for coloring hair and painting fingernails at a Genoa, Illinois beauty salon where she had been employed, Eileen Doman had never shown much of a predeliction for art. In the early 1990s, though, when she was nearing 40, she decided to try painting. Her life was to be quickly and radically transformed. By 1992, after her work was given exposure at the New York Outsider Art Fair, she was hailed as a major discovery. The people of Eileen Doman’s paintings are relatives and family friends, stopped in time, forty, fifty and more years ago. Most of the paintings spring from old family photographs. 
—from Dean Jensen Gallery Women’s Outsider Art, Part III:
Eileen Doman
Except for coloring hair and painting fingernails at a Genoa, Illinois beauty salon where she had been employed, Eileen Doman had never shown much of a predeliction for art. In the early 1990s, though, when she was nearing 40, she decided to try painting. Her life was to be quickly and radically transformed. By 1992, after her work was given exposure at the New York Outsider Art Fair, she was hailed as a major discovery. The people of Eileen Doman’s paintings are relatives and family friends, stopped in time, forty, fifty and more years ago. Most of the paintings spring from old family photographs. 
—from Dean Jensen Gallery Women’s Outsider Art, Part III:
Eileen Doman
Except for coloring hair and painting fingernails at a Genoa, Illinois beauty salon where she had been employed, Eileen Doman had never shown much of a predeliction for art. In the early 1990s, though, when she was nearing 40, she decided to try painting. Her life was to be quickly and radically transformed. By 1992, after her work was given exposure at the New York Outsider Art Fair, she was hailed as a major discovery. The people of Eileen Doman’s paintings are relatives and family friends, stopped in time, forty, fifty and more years ago. Most of the paintings spring from old family photographs. 
—from Dean Jensen Gallery Women’s Outsider Art, Part III:
Eileen Doman
Except for coloring hair and painting fingernails at a Genoa, Illinois beauty salon where she had been employed, Eileen Doman had never shown much of a predeliction for art. In the early 1990s, though, when she was nearing 40, she decided to try painting. Her life was to be quickly and radically transformed. By 1992, after her work was given exposure at the New York Outsider Art Fair, she was hailed as a major discovery. The people of Eileen Doman’s paintings are relatives and family friends, stopped in time, forty, fifty and more years ago. Most of the paintings spring from old family photographs. 
—from Dean Jensen Gallery Women’s Outsider Art, Part III:
Eileen Doman
Except for coloring hair and painting fingernails at a Genoa, Illinois beauty salon where she had been employed, Eileen Doman had never shown much of a predeliction for art. In the early 1990s, though, when she was nearing 40, she decided to try painting. Her life was to be quickly and radically transformed. By 1992, after her work was given exposure at the New York Outsider Art Fair, she was hailed as a major discovery. The people of Eileen Doman’s paintings are relatives and family friends, stopped in time, forty, fifty and more years ago. Most of the paintings spring from old family photographs. 
—from Dean Jensen Gallery

Women’s Outsider Art, Part III:

Eileen Doman

Except for coloring hair and painting fingernails at a Genoa, Illinois beauty salon where she had been employed, Eileen Doman had never shown much of a predeliction for art. In the early 1990s, though, when she was nearing 40, she decided to try painting. Her life was to be quickly and radically transformed. By 1992, after her work was given exposure at the New York Outsider Art Fair, she was hailed as a major discovery. The people of Eileen Doman’s paintings are relatives and family friends, stopped in time, forty, fifty and more years ago. Most of the paintings spring from old family photographs.

—from Dean Jensen Gallery